The Effects of Modified Melodic Intonation Therapy on Nonfluent Aphasia: A Pilot Study ObjectivePositive results have been reported with melodic intonation therapy (MIT) in nonfluent aphasia patients with damage to their left-brain speech processes, using the patient’s intact ability to sing to promote functional language. This pilot study sought to determine the immediate effects of introducing modified melodic intonation therapy (MMIT), a modification ... Article
Article  |   October 01, 2012
The Effects of Modified Melodic Intonation Therapy on Nonfluent Aphasia: A Pilot Study
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Dwyer Conklyn
    The Music Settlement, Cleveland, OH
  • Eric Novak
    The Cleveland Clinic Foundation
  • Adrienne Boissy
    The Cleveland Clinic Foundation
  • Francois Bethoux
    The Cleveland Clinic Foundation
  • Kamal Chemali
    The Cleveland Clinic Foundation
  • Correspondence to Dwyer Conklyn, who is now at DBC3 Music Therapy, LLC, Independence, OH: dbconk@gmail.com
  • Eric Novak is now at Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO.
    Eric Novak is now at Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO.×
  • Editor: Anne Smith
    Editor: Anne Smith×
  • Associate Editor: Wolfram Ziegler
    Associate Editor: Wolfram Ziegler×
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Language Disorders / Aphasia / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Speech
Article   |   October 01, 2012
The Effects of Modified Melodic Intonation Therapy on Nonfluent Aphasia: A Pilot Study
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 2012, Vol. 55, 1463-1471. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2012/11-0105)
History: Received May 2, 2011 , Revised October 21, 2011 , Accepted February 24, 2012
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 2012, Vol. 55, 1463-1471. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2012/11-0105)
History: Received May 2, 2011; Revised October 21, 2011; Accepted February 24, 2012
Web of Science® Times Cited: 10

ObjectivePositive results have been reported with melodic intonation therapy (MIT) in nonfluent aphasia patients with damage to their left-brain speech processes, using the patient’s intact ability to sing to promote functional language. This pilot study sought to determine the immediate effects of introducing modified melodic intonation therapy (MMIT), a modification of MIT, as an early intervention in stroke patients presenting with Broca’s aphasia.

MethodAfter a randomized controlled single-blind design, 30 acute stroke survivors with nonfluent aphasia were randomly assigned to receive MIT treatment or no treatment. A pre/post test, based on the responsive and repetition subsections of the Western Aphasia Battery, was developed for this study.

ResultsAfter 1 session, a significant within-subject change was observed for the treatment group’s adjusted total score (p = .02), and a significant difference between groups was found for adjusted total score (p = .02) favoring the treatment group. The treatment group also showed a significant change in their responsive subsection scores (p = .01) when their pre-tests from Visit 1 to Visit 2 were compared, whereas the control group showed no change, suggesting a possible carry-over effect of MIT treatment.

ConclusionThis study provides preliminary data supporting the possible benefits of utilizing MMIT treatment early in the recovery of nonfluent aphasia patients.

Acknowledgments
This research project was internally funded; no specific grant from any funding agency in the public, commercial, or not-for-profit sectors was received or used. We would like to thank Lisa Gallagher, Lisa Stellmacher, Angie Hamm, and Angelia Watley for their hard work and dedication to this project. We also acknowledge The Music Settlement and both the Arts and Medicine and Neurologic Institutes for their support.
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