The Effect of Articulatory Adjustment on Reducing Hypernasality PurposeWith the goal of using articulatory adjustments to reduce hypernasality, this study utilized an articulatory synthesis model (Childers, 2000) to simulate the adjustment of articulatory configurations with an open velopharynx to achieve the same acoustic goal as normal speech simulated with a closed velopharynx.MethodTo examine the effect of articulatory adjustment ... Article
Article  |   October 01, 2012
The Effect of Articulatory Adjustment on Reducing Hypernasality
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Panying Rong
    University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign
  • David Kuehn
    University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign
  • Correspondence to Panying Rong: prong2@illinois.edu
  • Editor: Anne Smith
    Editor: Anne Smith×
  • Associate Editor: Melanie Matthies
    Associate Editor: Melanie Matthies×
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Voice Disorders / Hearing & Speech Perception / Acoustics / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Speech
Article   |   October 01, 2012
The Effect of Articulatory Adjustment on Reducing Hypernasality
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 2012, Vol. 55, 1438-1448. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2012/11-0142)
History: Received June 2, 2011 , Revised September 7, 2011 , Accepted February 23, 2012
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 2012, Vol. 55, 1438-1448. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2012/11-0142)
History: Received June 2, 2011; Revised September 7, 2011; Accepted February 23, 2012
Web of Science® Times Cited: 8

PurposeWith the goal of using articulatory adjustments to reduce hypernasality, this study utilized an articulatory synthesis model (Childers, 2000) to simulate the adjustment of articulatory configurations with an open velopharynx to achieve the same acoustic goal as normal speech simulated with a closed velopharynx.

MethodTo examine the effect of articulatory adjustment on perceived nasality, this study used an articulatory synthesis model (Childers, 2000) to synthesize 18 oral /i/ vowels, 18 nasal /i/ vowels, and 18 nasal /i/ vowels with computer-generated articulatory adjustments; these vowels were then presented to 7 listeners for perceptual ratings of nasality following the direct magnitude estimation method.

ResultsComparisons of nasality ratings of nasal vowels showed a significant reduction of perceived nasality after articulatory adjustment. Moreover, the acoustic features associated with nasal resonances were attenuated and the oral formant structures changed by nasalization were restored after articulatory adjustment, which confirmed findings in Rong and Kuehn (2010) .

ConclusionAppropriate articulatory adjustments are able to reduce the nasality of synthetic nasal /i/ vowels by compensating for the acoustic deviations caused by excessive velopharyngeal opening. Such compensatory interarticulator coordination may have an application in using articulatory adjustments to reduce hypernasality in clinical speech therapies.

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