The Effect of Technology and Testing Environment on Speech Perception Using Telehealth With Cochlear Implant Recipients PurposeIn this study, the authors evaluated the effect of remote system and acoustic environment on speech perception via telehealth with cochlear implant recipients.MethodSpeech perception was measured in quiet and in noise. Systems evaluated were Polycom visual concert (PVC) and a hybrid presentation system (HPS). Each system was evaluated in a ... Article
Article  |   October 01, 2012
The Effect of Technology and Testing Environment on Speech Perception Using Telehealth With Cochlear Implant Recipients
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Jenny L. Goehring
    Boys Town National Research Hospital, Omaha, NE
  • Michelle L. Hughes
    Boys Town National Research Hospital, Omaha, NE
  • Jacquelyn L. Baudhuin
    Boys Town National Research Hospital, Omaha, NE
  • Daniel L. Valente
    Boys Town National Research Hospital, Omaha, NE
  • Ryan W. McCreery
    Boys Town National Research Hospital, Omaha, NE
  • Gina R. Diaz
    Boys Town National Research Hospital, Omaha, NE
  • Todd Sanford
    Boys Town National Research Hospital, Omaha, NE
  • Roger Harpster
    Boys Town National Research Hospital, Omaha, NE
  • Correspondence to Jenny L. Goehring: jenny.goehring@boystown.org
  • Editor: Sid Bacon
    Editor: Sid Bacon×
  • Associate Editor: Paul Abbas
    Associate Editor: Paul Abbas×
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Hearing & Speech Perception / Acoustics / Hearing Disorders / Hearing Aids, Cochlear Implants & Assistive Technology / Telepractice & Computer-Based Approaches / Hearing
Article   |   October 01, 2012
The Effect of Technology and Testing Environment on Speech Perception Using Telehealth With Cochlear Implant Recipients
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 2012, Vol. 55, 1373-1386. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2012/11-0358)
History: Received December 29, 2011 , Accepted February 22, 2012
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 2012, Vol. 55, 1373-1386. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2012/11-0358)
History: Received December 29, 2011; Accepted February 22, 2012
Web of Science® Times Cited: 6

PurposeIn this study, the authors evaluated the effect of remote system and acoustic environment on speech perception via telehealth with cochlear implant recipients.

MethodSpeech perception was measured in quiet and in noise. Systems evaluated were Polycom visual concert (PVC) and a hybrid presentation system (HPS). Each system was evaluated in a sound-treated booth and in a quiet office.

ResultsFor speech in quiet, there was a significant effect of environment, with better performance in the sound-treated booth than in the office; there was no effect of system (PVC or HPS). Speech in noise revealed a significant interaction between environment and system. Subjects' performance was poorer for PVC in the office, whereas performance in the sound-treated booth was not significantly different for the two systems. Results from the current study were compared to results for the same group of subjects from an earlier study; these results suggested that poorer performance at remote sites in the previous study was primarily due to environment, not system.

ConclusionsSpeech perception was best when evaluated in a sound-treated booth. HPS was superior for speech in noise in a reverberant environment. Future research should focus on modifications to non-sound-treated environments for telehealth service delivery in rural areas.

Acknowledgments
This study was supported by the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders (NIDCD) Grants 3R01DC009595-01A1S1 (awarded to M. L. Hughes) and P30DC04662 (awarded to W. Jesteadt). The content of this project is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of NIDCD or the National Institutes of Health. We thank Suman Barua and Jennifer Bournique for assistance with data collection as well as the subjects for their time and participation.
Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access