An Examination of the Associations Among Multiple Memory Systems, Past Tense, and Vocabulary in Typically Developing 5-Year-Old Children PurposeConsiderable research has investigated the role of verbal working memory in language development in children with and without language problems. Much less is currently known about the relationship between language and the declarative and procedural memory systems. This study examined whether these 2 memory systems were related to typically developing ... Article
Article  |   August 01, 2012
An Examination of the Associations Among Multiple Memory Systems, Past Tense, and Vocabulary in Typically Developing 5-Year-Old Children
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Evan Kidd
    The Australian National University, Canberra, Australia
  • Correspondence to Jarrad A. G. Lum: jarrad.lum@deakin.edu.au
  • Editor: Janna Oetting
    Editor: Janna Oetting×
  • Associate Editor: Sean Redmond
    Associate Editor: Sean Redmond×
Article Information
Development / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Language
Article   |   August 01, 2012
An Examination of the Associations Among Multiple Memory Systems, Past Tense, and Vocabulary in Typically Developing 5-Year-Old Children
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, August 2012, Vol. 55, 989-1006. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2011/10-0137)
History: Received May 24, 2010 , Revised October 28, 2010 , Accepted November 4, 2011
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, August 2012, Vol. 55, 989-1006. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2011/10-0137)
History: Received May 24, 2010; Revised October 28, 2010; Accepted November 4, 2011
Web of Science® Times Cited: 7

PurposeConsiderable research has investigated the role of verbal working memory in language development in children with and without language problems. Much less is currently known about the relationship between language and the declarative and procedural memory systems. This study examined whether these 2 memory systems were related to typically developing children’s past tense and lexical knowledge.

MethodFifty-eight typically developing children approximately 5 years of age completed a battery of linguistic and nonlinguistic tasks, including tests of vocabulary, past tense production, and procedural and declarative memory.

ResultsThe results showed that declarative and procedural memory were not correlated with either regular or irregular past tense use. A significant correlation was observed between declarative memory and vocabulary.

ConclusionsThe results of the study were not consistent with the view that the declarative and procedural memory systems support children’s use of the regular and irregular past tense. However, evidence was found suggesting that declarative memory supports vocabulary in this age group.

Acknowledgments
This research was supported by British Academy Grant SG-42144 (awarded to both authors) and a Charles La Trobe Research Fellowship (awarded to the second author). We thank Rachael King and Sarah Davis for help in testing the children, and we thank the schools and children who took part in this study.
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