Auditory, Visual, and Auditory–Visual Perceptions of Emotions by Young Children With Hearing Loss Versus Children With Normal Hearing PurposeThis study aimed to investigate the effect of hearing loss (HL) on emotion-perception ability among young children with and without HL.MethodA total of 26 children 4.0–6.6 years of age with prelingual sensory-neural HL ranging from moderate to profound and 14 children with normal hearing (NH) participated. They were asked to ... Article
Article  |   August 01, 2012
Auditory, Visual, and Auditory–Visual Perceptions of Emotions by Young Children With Hearing Loss Versus Children With Normal Hearing
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Hilit Michaelis
    Tel-Aviv University, Israel
  • Correspondence to Tova Most: tovam@post.tau.ac.il
  • Editor: Sid Bacon
    Editor: Sid Bacon×
  • Associate Editor: Charissa Lansing
    Associate Editor: Charissa Lansing×
Article Information
Hearing & Speech Perception / Hearing Disorders / Hearing
Article   |   August 01, 2012
Auditory, Visual, and Auditory–Visual Perceptions of Emotions by Young Children With Hearing Loss Versus Children With Normal Hearing
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, August 2012, Vol. 55, 1148-1162. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2011/11-0060)
History: Received March 9, 2011 , Revised September 19, 2011 , Accepted December 24, 2011
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, August 2012, Vol. 55, 1148-1162. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2011/11-0060)
History: Received March 9, 2011; Revised September 19, 2011; Accepted December 24, 2011
Web of Science® Times Cited: 18

PurposeThis study aimed to investigate the effect of hearing loss (HL) on emotion-perception ability among young children with and without HL.

MethodA total of 26 children 4.0–6.6 years of age with prelingual sensory-neural HL ranging from moderate to profound and 14 children with normal hearing (NH) participated. They were asked to identify happiness, anger, sadness, and fear expressed by an actress when uttering the same neutral nonsense sentence. Their auditory, visual, and auditory–visual perceptions of the emotional content were assessed.

ResultsThe accuracy of emotion perception among children with HL was lower than that of the NH children in all 3 conditions: auditory, visual, and auditory–visual. Perception through the combined auditory–visual mode significantly surpassed the auditory or visual modes alone in both groups, indicating that children with HL utilized the auditory information for emotion perception. No significant differences in perception emerged according to degree of HL. In addition, children with profound HL and cochlear implants did not perform differently from children with less severe HL who used hearing aids.

ConclusionThe relatively high accuracy of emotion perception by children with HL may be explained by their intensive rehabilitation, which emphasizes suprasegmental and paralinguistic aspects of verbal communication.

Acknowledgments
We express our appreciation to Dee Ankonina for her editorial contribution.
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