Use of Telehealth for Research and Clinical Measures in Cochlear Implant Recipients: A Validation Study PurposeThe goal of this study was to compare clinical and research-based cochlear implant (CI) measures using telehealth versus traditional methods.MethodThis prospective study used an ABA design (A = laboratory, B = remote site). All measures were made twice per visit for the purpose of assessing within-session variability. Twenty-nine adult and ... Article
Article  |   August 01, 2012
Use of Telehealth for Research and Clinical Measures in Cochlear Implant Recipients: A Validation Study
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Jenny L. Goehring
    Boys Town National Research Hospital, Omaha, Nebraska
  • Jacquelyn L. Baudhuin
    Boys Town National Research Hospital, Omaha, Nebraska
  • Gina R. Diaz
    Boys Town National Research Hospital, Omaha, Nebraska
  • Todd Sanford
    Boys Town National Research Hospital, Omaha, Nebraska
  • Roger Harpster
    Boys Town National Research Hospital, Omaha, Nebraska
  • Daniel L. Valente
    Boys Town National Research Hospital, Omaha, Nebraska
  • Correspondence to Michelle L. Hughes: michelle.hughes@boystown.org
  • Editor: Sid Bacon
    Editor: Sid Bacon×
  • Associate Editor: Paul Abbas
    Associate Editor: Paul Abbas×
Article Information
Hearing Disorders / Hearing Aids, Cochlear Implants & Assistive Technology / Research Issues, Methods & Evidence-Based Practice / Telepractice & Computer-Based Approaches / Hearing
Article   |   August 01, 2012
Use of Telehealth for Research and Clinical Measures in Cochlear Implant Recipients: A Validation Study
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, August 2012, Vol. 55, 1112-1127. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2011/11-0237)
History: Received August 26, 2011 , Accepted November 22, 2011
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, August 2012, Vol. 55, 1112-1127. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2011/11-0237)
History: Received August 26, 2011; Accepted November 22, 2011
Web of Science® Times Cited: 12

PurposeThe goal of this study was to compare clinical and research-based cochlear implant (CI) measures using telehealth versus traditional methods.

MethodThis prospective study used an ABA design (A = laboratory, B = remote site). All measures were made twice per visit for the purpose of assessing within-session variability. Twenty-nine adult and pediatric CI recipients participated. Measures included electrode impedance, electrically evoked compound action potential thresholds, psychophysical thresholds using an adaptive procedure, map thresholds and upper comfort levels, and speech perception. Subjects completed a questionnaire at the end of the study.

ResultsResults for all electrode-specific measures revealed no statistically significant differences between traditional and remote conditions. Speech perception was significantly poorer in the remote condition, which was likely due to the lack of a sound booth. In general, subjects indicated that they would take advantage of telehealth options at least some of the time, if such options were available.

ConclusionsResults from this study demonstrate that telehealth is a viable option for research and clinical measures. Additional studies are needed to investigate ways to improve speech perception at remote locations that lack sound booths and to validate the use of telehealth for pediatric services (e.g., play audiometry), sound-field threshold testing, and troubleshooting equipment.

Acknowledgments
This study was supported by National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders (NIDCD) Grants R01 DC009595, 3R01 DC009595-01A1S1, and P30DC04662. The content of this project is solely the authors' responsibility and does not necessarily represent the official views of the NIDCD or the National Institutes of Health. We thank the collaborators at the remote sites: Kathy Gosch, Wanda Kjar-Hunt, and Dale Gibbs at Good Samaritan Hospital; Mimi Mann and John Bernthal at the University of Nebraska–Lincoln; and Jessica Messersmith, Holly Eischens, and Crystal Dvorak at the University of South Dakota. We also thank Alexander Helbig and Suman Barua for assistance with data collection, and we thank the subjects for their participation.
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