Contributions of Morphological Awareness Skills to Word-Level Reading and Spelling in First-Grade Children With and Without Speech Sound Disorder PurposeIn this study, the authors compared the morphological awareness abilities of children with speech sound disorder (SSD) and children with typical speech skills and examined how morphological awareness ability predicted word-level reading and spelling performance above other known contributors to literacy development.MethodEighty-eight first-grade students—44 students with SSD and no known ... Article
Article  |   October 01, 2011
Contributions of Morphological Awareness Skills to Word-Level Reading and Spelling in First-Grade Children With and Without Speech Sound Disorder
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Jessika Lawrence
    Florida State University, Tallahassee
  • Correspondence to Kenn Apel: kenn.apel@cci.fsu.edu
  • Editor: Janna Oetting
    Editor: Janna Oetting×
  • Associate Editor: Julie Dockrell
    Associate Editor: Julie Dockrell×
Article Information
Development / Language
Article   |   October 01, 2011
Contributions of Morphological Awareness Skills to Word-Level Reading and Spelling in First-Grade Children With and Without Speech Sound Disorder
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 2011, Vol. 54, 1312-1327. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2011/10-0115)
History: Received April 30, 2010 , Accepted January 5, 2011
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 2011, Vol. 54, 1312-1327. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2011/10-0115)
History: Received April 30, 2010; Accepted January 5, 2011
Web of Science® Times Cited: 18

PurposeIn this study, the authors compared the morphological awareness abilities of children with speech sound disorder (SSD) and children with typical speech skills and examined how morphological awareness ability predicted word-level reading and spelling performance above other known contributors to literacy development.

MethodEighty-eight first-grade students—44 students with SSD and no known history of language deficiencies, and 44 students with typical speech and language skills—completed an assessment battery designed to measure speech sound production, morphological awareness, phonemic awareness, letter-name knowledge, receptive vocabulary, word-level reading, and spelling abilities.

ResultsThe children with SSD scored significantly lower than did their counterparts on the morphological awareness measures as well as on phonemic awareness, word-level reading, and spelling tasks. Regression analyses suggested that morphological awareness predicted significant unique variance on the spelling measure for both groups and on the word-level reading measure for the children with typical skills.

ConclusionThese results suggest that children with SSD may present with a general linguistic awareness insufficiency, which puts them at risk for difficulties with literacy and literacy-related tasks.

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