Effects of Computer System and Vowel Loading on Measures of Nasalance PurposeThe purpose of this study was to determine similarities and differences in nasalance scores observed with different computerized nasalance systems in the context of vowel-loaded sentences.MethodologySubjects were 46 Caucasian adults with no perceived hyper- or hyponasality. Nasalance scores were obtained using the Nasometer 6200 (Kay Elemetrics Corp.), the Nasometer II ... Research Note
Research Note  |   October 01, 2011
Effects of Computer System and Vowel Loading on Measures of Nasalance
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Shaheen N. Awan
    Bloomsburg University of Pennsylvania, Bloomsburg, PA
  • Kristin Omlor
    Northern York County School District, Dillsburg, PA
  • Christopher R. Watts
    Texas Christian University, Fort Worth, TX
  • Disclosure Statement
    Disclosure Statement×
    Shaheen N. Awan is the developer of the NasalView system used in this study. All rights and algorithms for the NasalView were acquired by Tiger DRS, Inc., in September 2011.
    Shaheen N. Awan is the developer of the NasalView system used in this study. All rights and algorithms for the NasalView were acquired by Tiger DRS, Inc., in September 2011.×
  • Correspondence to Shaheen N. Awan: sawan@bloomu.edu
  • Editor: Anne Smith
    Editor: Anne Smith×
  • Associate Editor: David Zajac
    Associate Editor: David Zajac×
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosody / Speech
Research Note   |   October 01, 2011
Effects of Computer System and Vowel Loading on Measures of Nasalance
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 2011, Vol. 54, 1284-1294. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2011/10-0201)
History: Received July 22, 2010 , Revised October 24, 2010 , Accepted January 21, 2011
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 2011, Vol. 54, 1284-1294. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2011/10-0201)
History: Received July 22, 2010; Revised October 24, 2010; Accepted January 21, 2011
Web of Science® Times Cited: 14

PurposeThe purpose of this study was to determine similarities and differences in nasalance scores observed with different computerized nasalance systems in the context of vowel-loaded sentences.

MethodologySubjects were 46 Caucasian adults with no perceived hyper- or hyponasality. Nasalance scores were obtained using the Nasometer 6200 (Kay Elemetrics Corp.), the Nasometer II 6400 (Kay Elemetrics Corp.), and the NasalView (Tiger DRS, Inc.) for sentences loaded with mixed, high front, high back, low front, or low back vowels.

ResultsMeasures of nasalance obtained with the NasalView were significantly higher than those obtained with the Nasometer 6200, and the measures of nasalance obtained with the Nasometer 6200 were significantly higher than those obtained with the Nasometer II 6400. However, similar effects of vowel loading on measures of nasalance were observed, regardless of system. For all systems, the high front vowel sentence tended to result in higher measures of nasalance than did the high back, low front, and low back vowel sentences—the mixed vowel sentence tended to have a higher degree of nasalance than did any of the other sentences.

ConclusionsAlthough nasalance data computed using different systems are not readily comparable, all three systems that were evaluated produced similar effects of vowel loading on nasalance. Increased nasalance for high front versus low back vowels may be due to factors such as increased oral impedance, reduced radiated oral sound pressure, possible increases in airflow via the nasal cavity, and increased transpalatal nasalance.

Acknowledgments
We would like to thank Stephen Crump, of KayPentax (formerly Kay Elemetrics), for his help in describing the Nasometer II 6400 system.
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