Changes to Articulatory Kinematics in Response to Loudness Cues in Individuals With Parkinson’s Disease PurposeIndividuals with Parkinson’s disease (PD) exhibit differences in displacement and velocity of the articulators as compared with older adults. The purpose of the current study was to examine effects of 3 loudness cues on articulatory movement patterns in individuals with PD.MethodNine individuals diagnosed with idiopathic PD and 9 age- and ... Article
Article  |   October 01, 2011
Changes to Articulatory Kinematics in Response to Loudness Cues in Individuals With Parkinson’s Disease
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Meghan Darling
    Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN
  • Correspondence to Jessica E. Huber: jhuber@purdue.edu
  • Editor: Robert Schlauch
    Editor: Robert Schlauch×
  • Associate Editor: Monica McHenry
    Associate Editor: Monica McHenry×
Article Information
Special Populations / Older Adults & Aging / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Speech
Article   |   October 01, 2011
Changes to Articulatory Kinematics in Response to Loudness Cues in Individuals With Parkinson’s Disease
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 2011, Vol. 54, 1247-1259. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2011/10-0024)
History: Received February 1, 2010 , Revised August 25, 2010 , Accepted January 6, 2011
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, October 2011, Vol. 54, 1247-1259. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2011/10-0024)
History: Received February 1, 2010; Revised August 25, 2010; Accepted January 6, 2011
Web of Science® Times Cited: 19

PurposeIndividuals with Parkinson’s disease (PD) exhibit differences in displacement and velocity of the articulators as compared with older adults. The purpose of the current study was to examine effects of 3 loudness cues on articulatory movement patterns in individuals with PD.

MethodNine individuals diagnosed with idiopathic PD and 9 age- and sex-matched healthy controls produced sentences in 4 conditions: (a) comfortable loudness, (b) targeting 10 dB above comfortable, (c) twice as loud as comfortable, and (d) in background noise. Lip and jaw kinematics and acoustic measurements were obtained.

ResultsBoth groups significantly increased sound pressure level (SPL) in the loud conditions as compared with the comfortable condition. For the loud conditions, both groups had the highest SPL in the background noise and the 10 dB conditions, and the lowest SPL in the twice as loud condition. Control participants produced the largest opening displacement in the background noise condition and the smallest opening displacement in the twice as loud condition. Conversely, individuals with PD produced the largest opening displacement in the twice as loud condition and the smallest opening displacement in the background noise condition.

ConclusionsControl participants and individuals with PD responded to cues to increase loudness in different ways. Changes in SPL may explain differences in kinematics for the control participants, but they do not explain such differences for individuals with PD.

Acknowledgment
This research was funded by National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders Grant 1R03DC05731. The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders or the National Institutes of Health.
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