Spatiotemporal Coupling of the Tongue in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis PurposeThe primary aim of the investigation was to identify deficits in spatiotemporal coupling between tongue regions in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). The relations between disease-related changes in tongue movement patterns and speech intelligibility were also determined.MethodsThe authors recorded word productions from 11 individuals with ALS with mild, moderate, and severe ... Article
Article  |   December 01, 2012
Spatiotemporal Coupling of the Tongue in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Jordan R. Green
    University of Nebraska–Lincoln
  • Yana Yunusova
    University of Toronto, Canada
  • Kathy Hanford
    University of Nebraska–Lincoln
  • Correspondence to Mili S. Kuruvilla: mili.kuruvilla@unmc.edu
  • Editor: Anne Smith
    Editor: Anne Smith×
  • Associate Editor: Julie Liss
    Associate Editor: Julie Liss×
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Special Populations / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Speech
Article   |   December 01, 2012
Spatiotemporal Coupling of the Tongue in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 2012, Vol. 55, 1897-1909. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2012/11-0259)
History: Received September 16, 2011 , Revised March 20, 2012 , Accepted April 30, 2012
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 2012, Vol. 55, 1897-1909. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2012/11-0259)
History: Received September 16, 2011; Revised March 20, 2012; Accepted April 30, 2012
Web of Science® Times Cited: 14

PurposeThe primary aim of the investigation was to identify deficits in spatiotemporal coupling between tongue regions in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). The relations between disease-related changes in tongue movement patterns and speech intelligibility were also determined.

MethodsThe authors recorded word productions from 11 individuals with ALS with mild, moderate, and severe dysarthria using an x-ray microbeam during word productions. A coupling index based on sliding window covariance was used to determine disease-related changes in the coupling between the tongue regions across each word.

ResultsThe results indicated decreased spatiotemporal coupling of mid-posterior tongue regions and reduced tongue speed in the ALS-moderate subgroup. Changes in the range of tongue coupling relations and speed of movement were highly correlated with speech intelligibility.

ConclusionsThese results provide new insights into the loss of lingual motor control due to ALS and suggest that measures of tongue performance may provide useful indicators of bulbar disease severity and progression.

Acknowledgments
This research was funded by National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders Grant R01 DC009890 and by the Bernice Ramsey Discovery Grant from ALS Canada. We thank Cynthia Didion, Lori Synhorst, Kimber Green, Casey Willett, Jun Wang, Jenna Mroczek, Kelley Barnett, and Suyash Joshi at the Speech Production Lab, University of Nebraska–Lincoln for their assistance with this project. We also thank Gary Weismer for access to the XRMB dysarthria database.
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