Article  |   December 2012
The Relationship Between Perception of Vocal Effort and Relative Fundamental Frequency During Voicing Offset and Onset
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Devon E. Sawin
    University of Washington, Seattle
  • Tanya L. Eadie
    University of Washington, Seattle
  • Correspondence to Cara E. Stepp: cstepp@bu.edu
  • Editor: Anne Smith
    Editor: Anne Smith×
  • Associate Editor: Shaheen Awan
    Associate Editor: Shaheen Awan×
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Voice Disorders / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Speech
Article   |   December 2012
The Relationship Between Perception of Vocal Effort and Relative Fundamental Frequency During Voicing Offset and Onset
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research December 2012, Vol.55, 1887-1896. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2012/11-0294)
History: Accepted 30 Apr 2012 , Received 30 Oct 2011 , Revised 24 Mar 2012
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research December 2012, Vol.55, 1887-1896. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2012/11-0294)
History: Accepted 30 Apr 2012 , Received 30 Oct 2011 , Revised 24 Mar 2012

Purpose: In this study, the authors aimed to determine the relationship between relative fundamental frequency (RFF) and listener perception of vocal effort in individuals with varying degrees of vocal hyperfunction.

Method: Thirty women diagnosed with voice disorders commonly associated with vocal hyperfunction and 10 healthy women provided speech samples that were used to obtain parameters of RFF. Twelve listeners judged the speech samples for overall severity and vocal effort (VE) using rating scales.

Results: Significant but relatively weak negative correlations were found between perceptual measures and offset RFF parameters. Although offset RFF was increased in healthy participants relative to speakers with voice disorders, no differences were seen in RFF as a function of severity of VE in individuals with voice disorders.

Conclusions: Although a statistically significant correlation between offset RFF and VE was found, examination of data as a function of both VE and health status indicated that RFF more accurately classifies the presence of a voice disorder than does severity of voice quality or VE. There is a need for further research to investigate the clinical utility of RFF measures for assessment of rehabilitation progress.

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