Aerodynamic and Nonlinear Dynamic Acoustic Analysis of Tension Asymmetry in Excised Canine Larynges Purpose: To model tension asymmetry caused by superior laryngeal nerve paralysis (SLNP) in excised larynges and apply perturbation, nonlinear dynamic, and aerodynamic analyses.Method: SLNP was modeled in 8 excised larynges using sutures and weights to mimic cricothyroid (CT) muscle function. Weights were removed from one side to create ... Article
Article  |   December 2012
Aerodynamic and Nonlinear Dynamic Acoustic Analysis of Tension Asymmetry in Excised Canine Larynges
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Erin E. Devine
    University of Wisconsin—Madison School of Medicine and Public Health
  • Erin E. Bulleit
    University of Wisconsin—Madison School of Medicine and Public Health
  • Matthew R. Hoffman
    University of Wisconsin—Madison School of Medicine and Public Health
  • Timothy M. McCulloch
    University of Wisconsin—Madison School of Medicine and Public Health
  • Correspondence to Jack J. Jiang: jjjiang@wisc.edu
  • Editor: Anne Smith
    Editor: Anne Smith×
  • Associate Editor: Roger Chan
    Associate Editor: Roger Chan×
  • © 2012 American Speech-Language-Hearing AssociationAmerican Speech-Language-Hearing Association
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Voice Disorders / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Speech
Article   |   December 2012
Aerodynamic and Nonlinear Dynamic Acoustic Analysis of Tension Asymmetry in Excised Canine Larynges
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 2012, Vol. 55, 1850-1861. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2012/11-0240)
History: Received August 29, 2011 , Revised January 20, 2012 , Accepted March 30, 2012
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 2012, Vol. 55, 1850-1861. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2012/11-0240)
History: Received August 29, 2011; Revised January 20, 2012; Accepted March 30, 2012

Purpose: To model tension asymmetry caused by superior laryngeal nerve paralysis (SLNP) in excised larynges and apply perturbation, nonlinear dynamic, and aerodynamic analyses.

Method: SLNP was modeled in 8 excised larynges using sutures and weights to mimic cricothyroid (CT) muscle function. Weights were removed from one side to create tension asymmetry, mimicking unilateral SLNP. Two sets of weights were used, 1 light and 1 heavy. Five conditions were evaluated: (a) no tension, (b) symmetrical light tension, (c) asymmetrical light tension, (d) symmetrical heavy tension, and (e) asymmetrical heavy tension.

Results: Perturbation parameters were not significantly different across conditions: percent jitter, χ2(4) = 3.70, p = .451; percent shimmer, F(4) = 0.95, p = .321. In addition, many measurements were invalid (error values >10). Second-order entropy was significantly different across conditions, F(4) = 5.432, p = .002, whereas correlation dimension was not, F(4) = 0.99, p = .428. Validity of these nonlinear dynamic parameters was demonstrated by low standard deviations. Phonation threshold pressure, χ2(4) = 22.50, p < .001, and power, χ2(4) = 9.50, p = .05, differed significantly across conditions, whereas phonation threshold flow did not, χ2(4) = 4.08, p = .396.

Conclusions: Nonlinear dynamic analysis differentiated between symmetrical and asymmetrical tension conditions, whereas traditional perturbation analysis was less useful in characterizing type 2 or 3 vocal signals. Supplementing acoustic with aerodynamic parameters may help distinguish among laryngeal disorders of neuromuscular origin.

Acknowledgments
This study was funded by National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders Grants R01 DC008153, R01 DC005522, R01 DC008850, and T32 DC009401.
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