Acoustics of Clear Speech: Effect of Instruction PurposeThis study investigated how different instructions for eliciting clear speech affected selected acoustic measures of speech.MethodTwelve speakers were audio-recorded reading 18 different sentences from the Assessment of Intelligibility of Dysarthric Speech (Yorkston & Beukelman, 1984). Sentences were produced in habitual, clear, hearing impaired, and overenunciate conditions. A variety of acoustic ... Article
Article  |   December 01, 2012
Acoustics of Clear Speech: Effect of Instruction
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Kris Tjaden
    University at Buffalo, NY
  • Greg Wilding
    University at Buffalo, NY
  • Correspondence to Jennifer Lam: jkyun@buffalo.edu
  • Editor: Anne Smith
    Editor: Anne Smith×
  • Associate Editor: Karen Forrest
    Associate Editor: Karen Forrest×
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosody / Speech
Article   |   December 01, 2012
Acoustics of Clear Speech: Effect of Instruction
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 2012, Vol. 55, 1807-1821. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2012/11-0154)
History: Received June 15, 2011 , Revised November 21, 2011 , Accepted March 7, 2012
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 2012, Vol. 55, 1807-1821. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2012/11-0154)
History: Received June 15, 2011; Revised November 21, 2011; Accepted March 7, 2012
Web of Science® Times Cited: 22

PurposeThis study investigated how different instructions for eliciting clear speech affected selected acoustic measures of speech.

MethodTwelve speakers were audio-recorded reading 18 different sentences from the Assessment of Intelligibility of Dysarthric Speech (Yorkston & Beukelman, 1984). Sentences were produced in habitual, clear, hearing impaired, and overenunciate conditions. A variety of acoustic measures were obtained.

ResultsRelative to habitual, the clear, hearing impaired, and overenunciate conditions were associated with different magnitudes of acoustic change for measures of vowel production, speech timing, and vocal intensity. The overenunciate condition tended to yield the greatest magnitude of change in vowel spectral measures and speech timing, followed by the hearing impaired and clear conditions. SPL tended to be the greatest in the hearing impaired condition for half of the speakers studied.

ConclusionsDifferent instructions for eliciting clear speech yielded acoustic adjustments of varying magnitude. Results have implications for direct comparison of studies using different instructions for eliciting clear speech. Results also have implications for optimizing clear speech training programs.

Acknowledgments
This research was supported by National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders Grant R01DC004689. Portions of this study were presented at the November 2010 Convention of the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association.
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