Perceptual Acclimatization Post Nonlinear Frequency Compression Hearing Aid Fitting in Older Children PurposeIn this study, the authors evaluated the effect of frequency compression hearing aids on speech perception ability and the time course and magnitude of acclimatization-related changes.MethodParticipants included children ages 11–18 years. Speech perception ability was evaluated over well-controlled baseline, treatment, and withdrawal study phases. Study-worn hearing aids were individually fitted ... Article
Article  |   December 01, 2012
Perceptual Acclimatization Post Nonlinear Frequency Compression Hearing Aid Fitting in Older Children
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Susan Scollie
    National Centre for Audiology, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario, Canada
  • Jacob Sulkers
    Central Speech and Hearing Clinic, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada
  • Correspondence to Danielle Glista: daglista@nca.uwo.ca
  • Editor: Sid Bacon
    Editor: Sid Bacon×
  • Associate Editor: Pam Souza
    Associate Editor: Pam Souza×
Article Information
Hearing Disorders / Hearing Aids, Cochlear Implants & Assistive Technology / Hearing
Article   |   December 01, 2012
Perceptual Acclimatization Post Nonlinear Frequency Compression Hearing Aid Fitting in Older Children
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 2012, Vol. 55, 1765-1787. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2012/11-0163)
History: Received June 30, 2011 , Revised November 14, 2011 , Accepted April 25, 2012
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 2012, Vol. 55, 1765-1787. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2012/11-0163)
History: Received June 30, 2011; Revised November 14, 2011; Accepted April 25, 2012
Web of Science® Times Cited: 20

PurposeIn this study, the authors evaluated the effect of frequency compression hearing aids on speech perception ability and the time course and magnitude of acclimatization-related changes.

MethodParticipants included children ages 11–18 years. Speech perception ability was evaluated over well-controlled baseline, treatment, and withdrawal study phases. Study-worn hearing aids were individually fitted to all participants. The authors evaluated speech perception ability using outcomes of speech detection (/s/ and /ʃ/ sounds), /s–ʃ/ discrimination, and plural and consonant recognition.

ResultsIndices of change were discussed on a case-by-case basis across all study phases. Significant treatment effects were measured for all cases, on at least one measure, with some listeners displaying significant acclimatization trends following a trial of frequency compression.

ConclusionFindings suggest that frequency compression provided varying outcomes, both in benefit and acclimatization, across listeners. For some, a period of acclimatization was necessary before change could be measured. For others, performance remained stable over the time course under evaluation, suggesting that some but not all children will experience improved speech recognition ability after a period of frequency compression hearing aid use.

Acknowledgments
This work was supported by Canadian Institutes of Health Research Grant 200710CGD-188045-172173, Masonic Help2Hear Foundation, and Phonak AG. Special thanks to David Lee and Steve Beaulac for their assistance on this project, and to Andrea Pittman, Chris Lee, Meg Cheesman, and Richard Seewald for their comments on the project in various stages of development and writing.
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