The Influence of Reduced Audible Bandwidth on Asynchronous Double-Vowel Identification PurposeIn this study, the authors sought to determine whether reduced audible bandwidth associated with hearing loss contributes to difficulty benefiting from an onset asynchrony between sounds.MethodSynthetic double-vowel identification was measured for normal-hearing listeners and listeners with hearing loss. One vowel (Target 2) was 250 ms in duration, and one (Target ... Article
Article  |   December 01, 2012
The Influence of Reduced Audible Bandwidth on Asynchronous Double-Vowel Identification
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Jennifer J. Lentz
    Indiana University, Bloomington
  • Correspondence to Susie Valentine: Susie_Valentine@Starkey.com
  • Editor: Sid Bacon
    Editor: Sid Bacon×
  • Associate Editor: Eric Healy
    Associate Editor: Eric Healy×
Article Information
Hearing Disorders / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Hearing
Article   |   December 01, 2012
The Influence of Reduced Audible Bandwidth on Asynchronous Double-Vowel Identification
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 2012, Vol. 55, 1750-1764. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2012/11-0033)
History: Received February 4, 2011 , Revised July 11, 2011 , Accepted April 19, 2012
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, December 2012, Vol. 55, 1750-1764. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2012/11-0033)
History: Received February 4, 2011; Revised July 11, 2011; Accepted April 19, 2012
Web of Science® Times Cited: 2

PurposeIn this study, the authors sought to determine whether reduced audible bandwidth associated with hearing loss contributes to difficulty benefiting from an onset asynchrony between sounds.

MethodSynthetic double-vowel identification was measured for normal-hearing listeners and listeners with hearing loss. One vowel (Target 2) was 250 ms in duration, and one (Target 1) varied in duration. The vowels had the same offset, and an onset asynchrony between the vowels ranged between 0 and 200 ms. Listeners identified both vowels in their perceived order. The scoring metrics used were as follows: Target 1 correctly identified in the correct position, Target 2 correctly identified in the correct position, ordered double-vowel identification, and unordered double-vowel identification. The same experiment was conducted with vowels low-pass filtered at 900 Hz simulating reduced audible bandwidth.

ResultsFor all scoring metrics, increases in onset asynchrony led to better vowel identification. Listeners with hearing loss benefited less from onset asynchrony than normal-hearing listeners only for Target 2 identification. Filtering the vowels reduced onset asynchrony benefit for all scoring categories and for both groups.

ConclusionResults implicate reduced audible bandwidth in difficulties of listeners when using onset asynchrony for sound segregation. Therefore, listeners with a reduced audible bandwidth may have communication difficulties in natural environments.

Acknowledgments
We thank Jumana Harianawala, Shen Yi, and Melissa Papesh for assistance with programming and data collection. Larry Humes, Diane Kewley-Port, William Shofner, and Rachael Holt provided valuable comments during the development and writing of this work.
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