Research Integrity Supplement  |   February 2011
Ethical Principles Associated With the Publication of Research in ASHA’s Scholarly Journals: Importance and Adequacy of Coverage
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Janis C. Ingham
    University of California, Santa Barbara
  • Fred D. Minifie
    University of Washington, Seattle
  • Jennifer Horner
    Ohio University, Athens
  • Randall R. Robey
    Ohio University, Athens
  • Charissa Lansing
    University of Illinois at Urbana—Champaign
  • James H. McCartney
    California State University, Sacramento
  • Sarah C. Slater
    University of California, Santa Barbara
  • Sharon E. Moss
    University of California, Santa Barbara
  • Contact author: Janis Costello Ingham, Department of Speech and Hearing Sciences, University of California, Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara, CA 93106. E-mail: jcingham@speech.ucsb.edu.
  • Sharon E. Moss is now at the Office of Research Oversight, Department of Veterans Affairs, Washington, DC.
    Sharon E. Moss is now at the Office of Research Oversight, Department of Veterans Affairs, Washington, DC.×
Article Information
Professional Issues & Training / ASHA News & Member Stories
Research Integrity Supplement   |   February 2011
Ethical Principles Associated With the Publication of Research in ASHA’s Scholarly Journals: Importance and Adequacy of Coverage
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 2011, Vol. 54, S394-S416. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2010/09-0260)
History: Received December 4, 2009 , Accepted October 4, 2010
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 2011, Vol. 54, S394-S416. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2010/09-0260)
History: Received December 4, 2009; Accepted October 4, 2010
Web of Science® Times Cited: 2

Purpose: The purpose of this 2-part study was to determine the importance of specific topics relating to publication ethics and adequacy of the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association’s (ASHA’s) policies regarding these topics.

Method: A 56-item Web-based survey was sent to (a) ASHA journal editors, associate editors, and members of the Publications Board (Group 1); (b) authors, reviewers, and members of ASHA’s Board of Ethics (Group 2); and (c) a random sample of the ASHA membership, characterized as journal readers (Group 3). The survey contained 4 questions related to ethical principles associated with the publication of research: (a) In regard to scientific integrity in research publications in general, how important is the issue of [topic]? (b) Should ASHA publication policies address this issue? (c) Do ASHA policies address this issue? (d) If yes, how adequately do ASHA policies address this issue? A second study evaluated the contents of ASHA’s publication policy documents in regard to their coverage of the survey topics.

Results: Results indicated many of the topics deemed most important by all groups were included in ASHA’s publication policy documents; other topics, although included, were not adequately addressed.

Conclusions: ASHA needs a single, unifying publication policy document, and increased education of all groups in the realm of ethics in the publication process is indicated.

Acknowledgments
This research was supported by a grant from the Office of Research Integrity and the National Institute of Neurological Diseases and Stroke (Grant NS44534-01) to Sharon E. Moss. We wish to give special thanks to Elham-Eid Alldredge of REDA International for her assistance in developing the format of the survey, and to Dean Garstecki, emeritus professor, Northwestern University, who served as a working member of the Research Integrity Grant Group during the development and fielding of the survey, and Joanne Jessen, former director of publications, American Speech-Language-Hearing Association.
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