Research Ethics III: Publication Practices and Authorship, Conflicts of Interest, and Research Misconduct Purpose: In this series of articles—Research Ethics I,Research Ethics II, and Research Ethics III—the authors provide a comprehensive review of the 9 core domains for the responsible conduct of research (RCR) as articulated by the Office of Research Integrity.Method: In Research Ethics III, they review the RCR domains ... Research Integrity Supplement
Research Integrity Supplement  |   February 2011
Research Ethics III: Publication Practices and Authorship, Conflicts of Interest, and Research Misconduct
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Jennifer Horner
    Ohio University, Athens
  • Fred D. Minifie
    University of Washington, Seattle
  • Contact author: Jennifer Horner, College of Health Sciences and Professions, Ohio University, W380 Grover Center, Athens, OH 45701. E-mail: hornerj@ohio.edu.
  • © 2011 American Speech-Language-Hearing AssociationAmerican Speech-Language-Hearing Association
Article Information
Research Issues, Methods & Evidence-Based Practice / Professional Issues & Training / Regulatory, Legislative & Advocacy
Research Integrity Supplement   |   February 2011
Research Ethics III: Publication Practices and Authorship, Conflicts of Interest, and Research Misconduct
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 2011, Vol. 54, S346-S362. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2010/09-0263)
History: Received December 4, 2009 , Revised September 7, 2010 , Accepted October 4, 2010
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 2011, Vol. 54, S346-S362. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2010/09-0263)
History: Received December 4, 2009; Revised September 7, 2010; Accepted October 4, 2010
Web of Science® Times Cited: 12

Purpose: In this series of articles—Research Ethics I,Research Ethics II, and Research Ethics III—the authors provide a comprehensive review of the 9 core domains for the responsible conduct of research (RCR) as articulated by the Office of Research Integrity.

Method: In Research Ethics III, they review the RCR domains of publication practices and authorship, conflicts of interest, and research misconduct. Whereas the legal definition of research misconduct under federal law pertains mainly to intentional falsification, fabrication, and plagiarism, they discuss a host of research practices that raise ethical concerns.

Conclusions: The integrity of the scientific record—its accuracy, completeness, and value—ultimately impacts the health and well-being of society. For this reason, scientists are both entrusted and obligated to use the highest standards possible when proposing, performing, reviewing, and reporting research or when educating and mentoring new investigators.

Acknowledgment
This research was supported by a grant from the Office of Research Integrity and National Institute of Neurological Diseases and Stroke Grant NS44534.
Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access