Research Ethics I: Responsible Conduct of Research (RCR)—Historical and Contemporary Issues Pertaining to Human and Animal Experimentation Purpose: In this series of articles—Research Ethics I,Research Ethics II, and Research Ethics III—the authors provide a comprehensive review of the 9 core domains for the responsible conduct of research (RCR) as articulated by the Office of Research Integrity. In Research Ethics I, they present a historical overview of ... Research Integrity Supplement
Research Integrity Supplement  |   February 2011
Research Ethics I: Responsible Conduct of Research (RCR)—Historical and Contemporary Issues Pertaining to Human and Animal Experimentation
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Jennifer Horner
    Ohio University, Athens
  • Fred D. Minifie
    University of Washington, Seattle
  • Contact author: Jennifer Horner, College of Health Sciences and Professions, Ohio University, W380 Grover Center, Athens, OH 45701. E-mail: hornerj@ohio.edu.
  • © 2011 American Speech-Language-Hearing AssociationAmerican Speech-Language-Hearing Association
Article Information
Research Issues, Methods & Evidence-Based Practice / Professional Issues & Training
Research Integrity Supplement   |   February 2011
Research Ethics I: Responsible Conduct of Research (RCR)—Historical and Contemporary Issues Pertaining to Human and Animal Experimentation
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 2011, Vol. 54, S303-S329. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2010/09-0265)
History: Received December 4, 2009 , Accepted October 4, 2010
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 2011, Vol. 54, S303-S329. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2010/09-0265)
History: Received December 4, 2009; Accepted October 4, 2010
Web of Science® Times Cited: 10

Purpose: In this series of articles—Research Ethics I,Research Ethics II, and Research Ethics III—the authors provide a comprehensive review of the 9 core domains for the responsible conduct of research (RCR) as articulated by the Office of Research Integrity. In Research Ethics I, they present a historical overview of the evolution of RCR in the United States then examine the evolution of human and animal experimentation from the birth of scientific medicine through World War II to the present day.

Method: They relied on authoritative documents, both historical and contemporary, insightful commentary, and empirical research in order to identify current issues and controversies of potential interest to both faculty and students.

Conclusions: The authors have written this article from a historical perspective because they think all readers interested in RCR should appreciate how the history of science and all the good—and harm—it has produced can inform how researchers practice responsible research in the 21st century and beyond.

Acknowledgment
This research was supported by a grant from the Office of Research Integrity and the National Institutes of Health Grant NS44534.
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