Psycholinguistic Profiling Differentiates Specific Language Impairment From Typical Development and From Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder PurposePractitioners must have confidence in the capacity of their language measures to discriminate developmental language disorders from typical development and from other common disorders. In this study, psycholinguistic profiles were collected from 3 groups: children with specific language impairment (SLI), children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), and children with typical development ... Article
Article  |   February 01, 2011
Psycholinguistic Profiling Differentiates Specific Language Impairment From Typical Development and From Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Sean M. Redmond
    University of Utah, Salt Lake City
  • Heather L. Thompson
    University of Utah, Salt Lake City
  • Sam Goldstein
    University of Utah, Salt Lake City
  • Contact author: Sean Redmond, Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, University of Utah, 390 South 1530 East BEHS, Room 1201, Salt Lake City, UT 84112-0252. E-mail: sean.redmond@health.utah.edu.
Article Information
Development / Normal Language Processing / Language Disorders / Specific Language Impairment / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Language
Article   |   February 01, 2011
Psycholinguistic Profiling Differentiates Specific Language Impairment From Typical Development and From Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 2011, Vol. 54, 99-117. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2010/10-0010)
History: Received January 19, 2010 , Revised April 19, 2010 , Accepted May 24, 2010
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 2011, Vol. 54, 99-117. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2010/10-0010)
History: Received January 19, 2010; Revised April 19, 2010; Accepted May 24, 2010
Web of Science® Times Cited: 30

PurposePractitioners must have confidence in the capacity of their language measures to discriminate developmental language disorders from typical development and from other common disorders. In this study, psycholinguistic profiles were collected from 3 groups: children with specific language impairment (SLI), children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), and children with typical development (TD). The capacity of different language indices to successfully discriminate SLI cases from TD and ADHD cases was examined through response operating characteristics curves, likelihood ratios, and binary logistic regression.

MethodThe Test of Early Grammatical Impairment (Rice & Wexler, 2001a), Dollaghan and Campbell’s (1998)  nonword repetition task, Redmond’s (2005)  sentence recall task, and the Test of Narrative Language (Gillam & Pearson, 2004) were administered to 60 children (7–8 years of age).

ResultsDiagnostic accuracy was high for all 4 psycholinguistic measures, although modest reductions were observed with the SLI versus ADHD discriminations. Classification accuracy associated with using the Test of Early Grammatical Impairment and the Sentence Recall task was equivalent to using all 4 measures.

ImplicationsOutcomes confirmed and extended previous investigations, documenting high levels of diagnostic integrity for these particular indices and supporting their incorporation into eligibility decisions, differential diagnosis, and the identification of comorbidity.

Acknowledgments
Funding was provided by National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders Grant 5R03CD838 (“Psycholinguistic and Socioemotional Profiling of SLI and ADHD”). Portions of this study were presented at the 2008 American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) Annual Convention, Chicago, IL.
This study would not have been possible without the generosity and patience of the participants and their families. Appreciation is extended to Christine Dollaghan for providing us with her stimuli. Appreciation is also extended to the following people for their assistance in recruiting potential participants: Rebecca Garda (Jordan School District), Lisa Holmstead (Salt Lake City School District), Linda Smith (Utah chapter of Children and Adults With Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder), Carrie Francis (Boys and Girls Club), Janet Goldstein (University of Utah Speech, Language, and Hearing Clinic), and Sandra Gillam (Utah State University). Several graduate and undergraduate students from the University of Utah Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders assisted in various aspects of the project and deserve recognition for their contributions: Chelsea Ash, Tiffany Boman, Lyndi Ballard, Melanie Cobabe, Jamie Dressler, Britta Rajamaki, Jennifer Thinnes Whittaker, and Melissa Whitchurch.
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