Automated Measurement of Vocal Fold Vibratory Asymmetry From High-Speed Videoendoscopy Recordings PurposeIn prior work, a manually derived measure of vocal fold vibratory phase asymmetry correlated to varying degrees with visual judgments made from laryngeal high-speed videoendoscopy (HSV) recordings. This investigation extended this work by establishing an automated HSV-based framework to quantify 3 categories of vocal fold vibratory asymmetry.MethodHSV-based analysis provided for ... Research Note
Research Note  |   February 01, 2011
Automated Measurement of Vocal Fold Vibratory Asymmetry From High-Speed Videoendoscopy Recordings
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Daryush D. Mehta
    Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston; Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge; and MIT Lincoln Laboratory, Lexington, MA
  • Dimitar D. Deliyski
    University of South Carolina, Columbia
  • Thomas F. Quatieri
    MIT Lincoln Laboratory
  • Robert E. Hillman
    Massachusetts General Hospital; Massachusetts Institute of Technology; and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA
  • Contact author: Daryush D. Mehta, Massachusetts General Hospital, Center for Laryngeal Surgery and Voice Rehabilitation, 1 Bowdoin Square, 11th Floor, Boston, MA 02114. E-mail: daryush.mehta@alum.mit.edu.
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Voice Disorders / Speech
Research Note   |   February 01, 2011
Automated Measurement of Vocal Fold Vibratory Asymmetry From High-Speed Videoendoscopy Recordings
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 2011, Vol. 54, 47-54. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2010/10-0026)
History: Received February 1, 2010 , Accepted June 23, 2010
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 2011, Vol. 54, 47-54. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2010/10-0026)
History: Received February 1, 2010; Accepted June 23, 2010
Web of Science® Times Cited: 40

PurposeIn prior work, a manually derived measure of vocal fold vibratory phase asymmetry correlated to varying degrees with visual judgments made from laryngeal high-speed videoendoscopy (HSV) recordings. This investigation extended this work by establishing an automated HSV-based framework to quantify 3 categories of vocal fold vibratory asymmetry.

MethodHSV-based analysis provided for cycle-to-cycle estimates of left–right phase asymmetry, left–right amplitude asymmetry, and axis shift during glottal closure for 52 speakers with no vocal pathology producing comfortable and pressed phonation. An initial cross-validation of the automated left–right phase asymmetry measure was performed by correlating the measure with other objective and subjective assessments of phase asymmetry.

ResultsVocal fold vibratory asymmetry was exhibited to a similar extent in both comfortable and pressed phonations. The automated measure of left–right phase asymmetry strongly correlated with manually derived measures and moderately correlated with visual–perceptual ratings. Correlations with the visual–perceptual ratings remained relatively consistent as the automated measure was derived from kymograms taken at different glottal locations.

ConclusionsAn automated HSV-based framework for the quantification of vocal fold vibratory asymmetry was developed and initially validated. This framework serves as a platform for investigating relationships between vocal fold tissue motion and acoustic measures of voice function.

Acknowledgments
This work was supported by grants from the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders (T32 DC00038 and R01 DC007640) and by the Institute of Laryngology and Voice Restoration. Its contents are solely the responsibility of the authors and do not necessarily represent the official views of the National Institutes of Health. The work of the first and third authors was sponsored under Air Force Contract FA8721-05-C-0002. The opinions, interpretations, conclusions, and recommendations are those of the authors and are not necessarily endorsed by the U.S. government. We thank Terri Treman Gerlach and Heather Shaw Bonilha for recording the HSV data and for assisting in accessing and organizing the preexisting visual–perceptual ratings database (Bonilha et al., 2008) that was used in this study.
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