Effect of Parkinson’s Disease on the Production of Structured and Unstructured Speaking Tasks: Respiratory Physiologic and Linguistic Considerations PurposeTo examine the effects of cognitive–linguistic deficits and respiratory physiologic changes on respiratory support for speech in individuals with Parkinson’s disease (PD) using two speech tasks: reading and extemporaneous speech.MethodFive women with PD, 9 men with PD, and 14 age- and sex-matched control participants read a passage and spoke extemporaneously ... Article
Article  |   February 01, 2011
Effect of Parkinson’s Disease on the Production of Structured and Unstructured Speaking Tasks: Respiratory Physiologic and Linguistic Considerations
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Jessica E. Huber
    Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN
  • Meghan Darling
    Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN
  • Contact author: Jessica E. Huber, Department of Speech, Language, and Hearing Sciences, 1353 Heavilon Hall, Purdue University, 500 Oval Drive, West Lafayette, IN 47907. E-mail: jhuber@purdue.edu.
Article Information
Special Populations / Older Adults & Aging / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Speech
Article   |   February 01, 2011
Effect of Parkinson’s Disease on the Production of Structured and Unstructured Speaking Tasks: Respiratory Physiologic and Linguistic Considerations
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 2011, Vol. 54, 33-46. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2010/09-0184)
History: Received August 26, 2009 , Revised March 11, 2010 , Accepted August 5, 2010
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 2011, Vol. 54, 33-46. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2010/09-0184)
History: Received August 26, 2009; Revised March 11, 2010; Accepted August 5, 2010
Web of Science® Times Cited: 24

PurposeTo examine the effects of cognitive–linguistic deficits and respiratory physiologic changes on respiratory support for speech in individuals with Parkinson’s disease (PD) using two speech tasks: reading and extemporaneous speech.

MethodFive women with PD, 9 men with PD, and 14 age- and sex-matched control participants read a passage and spoke extemporaneously on a topic of their choice at comfortable loudness. Sound pressure level, syllables per breath group, speech rate, and lung volume parameters were measured. Number of formulation errors, disfluencies, and filled pauses were counted.

ResultsIndividuals with PD produced shorter utterances compared with control participants. The relationships between utterance length and lung volume initiation and inspiratory duration were weaker for individuals with PD than for control participants, particularly for the extemporaneous speech task. These results suggest less consistent planning for utterance length by individuals with PD in extemporaneous speech. Individuals with PD produced more formulation errors in both tasks and significantly fewer filled pauses in extemporaneous speech.

ConclusionBoth respiratory physiologic and cognitive–linguistic issues affected speech production by individuals with PD. Overall, individuals with PD had difficulty planning or coordinating language formulation and respiratory support, particularly during extemporaneous speech.

Acknowledgments
This research was supported by National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders Grant 1R03DC05731 and a Research Support Incentive Grant from the Center on Aging and the Life Course at Purdue University. The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders, the National Institutes of Health, or the Center on Aging and the Life Course at Purdue University.
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