The Relationship Between Brainstem Temporal Processing and Performance on Tests of Central Auditory Function in Children With Reading Disorders PurposeStudies using speech stimuli to elicit electrophysiologic responses have found approximately 30% of children with language-based learning problems demonstrate abnormal brainstem timing. Research is needed regarding how these responses relate to performance on behavioral tests of central auditory function. The purpose of the study was to investigate performance of children ... Article
Article  |   February 01, 2011
The Relationship Between Brainstem Temporal Processing and Performance on Tests of Central Auditory Function in Children With Reading Disorders
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Cassandra R. Billiet
    The University of South Dakota, Vermillion, and Oakdale Ear, Nose, and Throat Clinic, Maple Grove, MN
  • Teri James Bellis
    Sanford School of Medicine, The University of South Dakota, Vermillion
  • Contact author: Cassandra R. Billiet, Oakdale Ear, Nose, and Throat Clinic, 9825 Hospital Drive, Suite 203, Maple Grove, MN 55369. E-mail: cbilliet@oakdaleent.com.
Article Information
Hearing & Speech Perception / Hearing Disorders / Language Disorders / Reading & Writing Disorders / Hearing
Article   |   February 01, 2011
The Relationship Between Brainstem Temporal Processing and Performance on Tests of Central Auditory Function in Children With Reading Disorders
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 2011, Vol. 54, 228-242. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2010/09-0239)
History: Received November 4, 2009 , Revised March 28, 2010 , Accepted June 7, 2010
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 2011, Vol. 54, 228-242. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2010/09-0239)
History: Received November 4, 2009; Revised March 28, 2010; Accepted June 7, 2010
Web of Science® Times Cited: 16

PurposeStudies using speech stimuli to elicit electrophysiologic responses have found approximately 30% of children with language-based learning problems demonstrate abnormal brainstem timing. Research is needed regarding how these responses relate to performance on behavioral tests of central auditory function. The purpose of the study was to investigate performance of children with dyslexia with and without abnormal brainstem timing and children with no history of learning or related disorders on behavioral tests of central auditory function.

MethodPerformance of 30 school-age children on behavioral central auditory tests in common clinical use was examined: Group 1 (n = 10): dyslexia, abnormal brainstem timing; Group 2 (n = 10): dyslexia, normal brainstem timing; Group 3 (n = 10): typical controls.

ResultsResults indicated that all participants in Group 2 met diagnostic criteria for (central) auditory processing disorder [(C)APD], whereas only 4 participants in Group 1 met criteria. The Biological Marker of Auditory Processing (BioMARK) identified 6 children in Group 1 who did not meet diagnostic criteria for (C)APD but displayed abnormal brainstem timing.

ConclusionsResults underscore the importance of central auditory assessment for children with dyslexia. Furthermore, the BioMARK may be useful in identifying children with central auditory dysfunction who would not have been identified using behavioral methods of (C)APD assessment.

Acknowledgments
This study was supported by the John W. Carlson Research Grant, which was awarded through the College of Arts and Sciences at the University of South Dakota, Vermillion, SD. Additional support was provided by internal research funding through the Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders at The University of South Dakota and by a subproject of National Institutes of Research Resources Grant P20 RR-015567 awarded to Teri James Bellis that is designated as a Center of Biomedical Research Excellence (COBRE).
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