Using Aided AAC Models, Recasts, and Contrastive Targets to Teach Grammatical Morphemes to Children Who Use AAC PurposeThe purpose of the investigation was to evaluate the effects of using aided augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) modeling and recasting on the expression of grammatical morphemes with children who used AAC.MethodA single-subject, multiple-probe, across-targets design was used for the study. Three participants were each taught to use 3 grammatical ... Article
Article  |   February 01, 2011
Using Aided AAC Models, Recasts, and Contrastive Targets to Teach Grammatical Morphemes to Children Who Use AAC
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Cathy Binger
    University of New Mexico, Albuquerque
  • Molly Maguire-Marshall
    University of New Mexico, Albuquerque
  • Jennifer Kent-Walsh
    University of Central Florida, Orlando
  • Contact author: Cathy Binger, Department of Speech and Hearing Sciences, 1700 Lomas NE, MSC01 1195, 1 University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131. E-mail: cbinger@unm.edu.
Article Information
Augmentative & Alternative Communication / Language
Article   |   February 01, 2011
Using Aided AAC Models, Recasts, and Contrastive Targets to Teach Grammatical Morphemes to Children Who Use AAC
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 2011, Vol. 54, 160-176. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2010/09-0163)
History: Received August 6, 2009 , Accepted June 24, 2010
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 2011, Vol. 54, 160-176. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2010/09-0163)
History: Received August 6, 2009; Accepted June 24, 2010
Web of Science® Times Cited: 18

PurposeThe purpose of the investigation was to evaluate the effects of using aided augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) modeling and recasting on the expression of grammatical morphemes with children who used AAC.

MethodA single-subject, multiple-probe, across-targets design was used for the study. Three participants were each taught to use 3 grammatical structures. Intervention consisted of aided AAC models and recasts during storybook reading tasks.

ResultsAll three children readily began using the targeted grammatical morphemes. However, none of the participants maintained use of the first morpheme. Error analyses revealed that the children either omitted the targeted morpheme or replaced it with another morpheme. To address this issue, a second intervention phase was implemented for the targets that were not maintained. During this phase, various grammatical morphemes were contrasted with each other (e.g., past tense –ed vs. possessive 's). Following the second intervention phase, participants maintained all targets.

ConclusionsAided AAC models and recasts may be used as part of intervention packages designed to help children acquire production of grammatical morphemes; however, it is important to provide contrasts of grammatical forms to ensure acquisition. Theoretical and clinical implications are discussed.

Acknowledgments
The first and third authors owe an enormous debt of gratitude to the American Speech-Language-Hearing Foundation (ASHFoundation), which has provided so much support for our work. This particular project was supported by a New Century Scholars Research Grant from the ASH Foundation. Preliminary results were presented at the Annual Convention of the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association in Boston, MA, November 2007; the Biennial Convention of the International Society for Augmentative and Alternative Communication in Montreal, Quebec, Canada, August 2008; and the Annual Conference of the ASHA Special Interest Division on AAC, Long Beach, CA, February 2008. Special thanks to the Prentke Romich Co. for their donation of a speech-generating device. We also are indebted to the following research assistants for their work on this project: Jackie Berens, Cai Ewing, Eliya Kirby, Stephanie McDougle, Rachel Schmitt, and Stacy Taylor. Many thanks to the Albuquerque Public Schools Assistive Technology Team, particularly Annette O’Connor and Gwen Sanchez, for continual assistance with locating participants. Finally, we are truly grateful to the children who participated in this study and their families; this research could not have been completed without their kind cooperation.
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