The Main Concept Analysis in Cantonese Aphasic Oral Discourse: External Validation and Monitoring Chronic Aphasia Purpose: The 1st aim of this study was to further establish the external validity of the main concept (MC) analysis by examining its relationship with the Cantonese Linguistic Communication Measure (CLCM; Kong, 2006; Kong & Law, 2004)—an established quantitative system for narrative production—and the Cantonese version of the Western ... Article
Article  |   February 2011
The Main Concept Analysis in Cantonese Aphasic Oral Discourse: External Validation and Monitoring Chronic Aphasia
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Anthony Pak-Hin Kong
    University of Central Florida, Orlando
  • Contact author: Anthony Pak-Hin Kong, Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, University of Central Florida, Orlando, FL 32816. E-mail: pkong@mail.ucf.edu.
  • © 2011 American Speech-Language-Hearing AssociationAmerican Speech-Language-Hearing Association
Article Information
Special Populations / Cultural & Linguistic Diversity / Language Disorders / Aphasia / Language
Article   |   February 2011
The Main Concept Analysis in Cantonese Aphasic Oral Discourse: External Validation and Monitoring Chronic Aphasia
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 2011, Vol. 54, 148-159. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2010/09-0240)
History: Received November 4, 2009 , Revised February 11, 2010 , Accepted June 14, 2010
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 2011, Vol. 54, 148-159. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2010/09-0240)
History: Received November 4, 2009; Revised February 11, 2010; Accepted June 14, 2010

Purpose: The 1st aim of this study was to further establish the external validity of the main concept (MC) analysis by examining its relationship with the Cantonese Linguistic Communication Measure (CLCM; Kong, 2006; Kong & Law, 2004)—an established quantitative system for narrative production—and the Cantonese version of the Western Aphasia Battery (CAB; Yiu, 1992). The 2nd purpose of the study was to evaluate how well the MC analysis reflects the stability of discourse production among chronic Cantonese speakers with aphasia.

Method: Sixteen participants with aphasia were evaluated on the MC analysis, CAB, and CLCM in the summer of 2008 and were subsequently reassessed in the summer of 2009. They encompassed a range of aphasia severity (with an Aphasia Quotient ranging between 30.2/100 and 94.8/100 at the time of the 1st evaluation).

Results: Significant associations were found between the MC measures and the corresponding CLCM indices and CAB performance scores that were relevant to the presence, accuracy, and completeness of content in oral narratives. Moreover, the MC analysis was found to yield comparable scores for chronic speakers on 2 occasions 1 year apart.

Conclusion: The present study has further established the external validity of MC analysis in Cantonese. Future investigations involving more speakers with aphasia will allow adequate description of its psychometric properties.

Acknowledgments
The work reported in this article was supported by the College of Health and Public Affairs In-House Research Grant, University of Central Florida. I am grateful to all the participants for taking part in this study as well as to Siu-Lam Yuen and Kwok-Fan Poon for their assistance in participant recruitment. Special thanks to Lorinda Kwan for arranging student clinicians to assist in data collecting and analyses for this study.
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