Article  |   February 2010
Phonological Awareness and Types of Sound Errors in Preschoolers With Speech Sound Disorders
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Jonathan Preston
    Haskins Laboratories, New Haven, CT
  • Mary Louise Edwards
    Syracuse University, Syracuse, NY
  • Contact author: Jonathan Preston, Haskins Laboratories, 300 George Street, Suite 900, New Haven, CT 06511. E-mail: preston@haskins.yale.edu.
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Speech
Article   |   February 2010
Phonological Awareness and Types of Sound Errors in Preschoolers With Speech Sound Disorders
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 2010, Vol. 53, 44-60. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2009/09-0021)
History: Received February 3, 2009 , Accepted May 13, 2009
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 2010, Vol. 53, 44-60. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2009/09-0021)
History: Received February 3, 2009; Accepted May 13, 2009
Web of Science® Times Cited: 9

Purpose: Some children with speech sound disorders (SSD) have difficulty with literacy-related skills, particularly phonological awareness (PA). This study investigates the PA skills of preschoolers with SSD by using a regression model to evaluate the degree to which PA can be concurrently predicted by types of speech sound errors.

Method: Preschoolers with SSD (n = 43) participated in PA and speech sound production assessment. Errors from a 125-item picture naming task were coded in 2 ways: (a) considering all consonant errors equally (percentage of consonants correct [PCC]) and (b) using a 3-category system that captures component features of sound errors (typical sound changes, atypical sound changes, and distortions). PA tasks included rhyme matching, onset matching, onset segmentation and matching, and blending.

Results: Variance in a PA composite score could be predicted partly by vocabulary and age (33%). Atypical sound changes accounted for an additional 6% of variance in PA, but distortions and typical errors did not account for significant variance. When the same consonant errors were analyzed using PCC, speech errors did not predict significant variance in PA.

Conclusions: Poorer PA is associated with lower receptive vocabularies and more atypical sound errors. Results are interpreted in the context of the accuracy of phonological representations.

Acknowledgments
This research was completed in partial fulfillment of dissertation work completed by the first author at Syracuse University. Thanks to the families that participated in this research and to the clinicians who referred children. Helpful comments were provided by Lawrence Shriberg, Carol Fowler, Raymond Colton, Linda Milosky, Benita Blachman, James Bellini, and Annette Jenner-Matthews. This research was supported in part by the 2007 American Speech-Language-Hearing Foundation grant in Early Child Language Development awarded to the first author.
Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access