Long-Term Effects of Early-Life Otitis Media on Language Development PurposeThe aim of the present study was to examine the long-term consequences of early-life otitis media (OM) and the associated hearing loss (HL) on language skills of school-aged children.MethodIn a prospective study, the middle-ear status of 65 Dutch healthy-born children was documented every 3 months during their first 2 years ... Article
Article  |   February 01, 2010
Long-Term Effects of Early-Life Otitis Media on Language Development
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Anne Zumach
    Maastricht University Medical Centre, Maastricht, the Netherlands
  • Ellen Gerrits
    Maastricht University Medical Centre, Maastricht, the Netherlands
  • Michelene Chenault
    Maastricht University Medical Centre, Maastricht, the Netherlands
  • Lucien Anteunis
    Maastricht University Medical Centre, Maastricht, the Netherlands
  • Contact author: Anne Zumach, Maastricht University Medical Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology and Head & Neck Surgery, P. Debyelaan 25, Maastricht 6229HX, the Netherlands. E-mail: anne.zumach@mumc.nl.
Article Information
Development / Hearing Disorders / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Hearing
Article   |   February 01, 2010
Long-Term Effects of Early-Life Otitis Media on Language Development
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 2010, Vol. 53, 34-43. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2009/08-0250)
History: Received December 3, 2008 , Revised April 1, 2009 , Accepted July 17, 2009
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 2010, Vol. 53, 34-43. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2009/08-0250)
History: Received December 3, 2008; Revised April 1, 2009; Accepted July 17, 2009
Web of Science® Times Cited: 13

PurposeThe aim of the present study was to examine the long-term consequences of early-life otitis media (OM) and the associated hearing loss (HL) on language skills of school-aged children.

MethodIn a prospective study, the middle-ear status of 65 Dutch healthy-born children was documented every 3 months during their first 2 years of life; language comprehension and production were evaluated at 27 months and again at 7 years.

ResultsThe positive relation that was found between OM-related HL and language development at 27 months could no longer be discerned at school age. Accordingly, parent-reported HL between 2 and 7 years had no effect on scores at school age.

ConclusionThe present study shows that negative consequences of early-life OM or the underlying HL on language comprehension and production appear to be resolved by the age of 7. It also shows that parent-reported HL between 2 and 7 years is not related to language skills at school age.

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