Accuracy of Consonant–Vowel Syllables in Young Cochlear Implant Recipients and Hearing Children in the Single-Word Period PurposeAttaining speech accuracy requires that children perceive and attach meanings to vocal output on the basis of production system capacities. Because auditory perception underlies speech accuracy, profiles for children with hearing loss (HL) differ from those of children with normal hearing (NH).MethodTo understand the impact of auditory history on emergence ... Article
Article  |   February 01, 2010
Accuracy of Consonant–Vowel Syllables in Young Cochlear Implant Recipients and Hearing Children in the Single-Word Period
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Andrea D. Warner-Czyz
    The University of Texas at Dallas
  • Barbara L. Davis
    The University of Texas at Austin
  • Peter F. MacNeilage
    The University of Texas at Austin
  • Contact author: Andrea D. Warner-Czyz, The University of Texas at Dallas, Callier Center for Communication Disorders, 1966 Inwood Road, Dallas, TX 75235. E-mail: warnerczyz@utdallas.edu.
Article Information
Hearing Aids, Cochlear Implants & Assistive Technology / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Hearing
Article   |   February 01, 2010
Accuracy of Consonant–Vowel Syllables in Young Cochlear Implant Recipients and Hearing Children in the Single-Word Period
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 2010, Vol. 53, 2-17. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2009/08-0163)
History: Received August 8, 2008 , Revised February 22, 2009 , Accepted June 4, 2009
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 2010, Vol. 53, 2-17. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2009/08-0163)
History: Received August 8, 2008; Revised February 22, 2009; Accepted June 4, 2009

PurposeAttaining speech accuracy requires that children perceive and attach meanings to vocal output on the basis of production system capacities. Because auditory perception underlies speech accuracy, profiles for children with hearing loss (HL) differ from those of children with normal hearing (NH).

MethodTo understand the impact of auditory history on emergence of speech capacities, the authors compared consonant–vowel (CV) syllable accuracy in early words in 4 NH children and 4 children with HL who received cochlear implantation (CI) before age 2 years. Participants were video-recorded monthly for 6 months following word onset. CV vocalizations were coded perceptually with broad phonetic transcription. Observed-to-expected ratios of CV productions and accuracy were tested with chi-square analysis. An ordered multinomial model tested level of accuracy, including both accuracy and error patterns.

ResultsMost frequently produced sequences were most accurately produced across group and time. NH children were more accurate overall than children with CI. Both groups improved accuracy over time by decreasing partially accurate productions (accurate consonant–inaccurate vowel). Both groups favored CV patterns with compatible place of articulation between consonant and vowel in absolute frequency and level of accuracy.

ConclusionDifferences in emergence of CV syllable accuracy arise from differences in auditory perception between the NH and CI groups.

Acknowledgments
Funding for this project was provided by the Professional Development Award from the Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders at The University of Texas at Austin. This work was also supported in part by National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Grant R-01 HD27733-07, titled “Motor Control of Serial Organization of Early Speech” (Peter MacNeilage and Barbara Davis, co-Principal Investigators). This publication was supported, in part, by Grant KL2RR024983, titled “North and Central Texas Clinical and Translational Science Initiative” (Milton Packer, Principal Investigator), from the National Center for Research Resources, a component of the National Institutes of Health (NIH); and by the NIH Roadmap for Medical Research. We gratefully acknowledge the children and families who participated in this project.
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