A Kinematic Description of the Temporal Characteristics of Jaw Motion for Early Chewing: Preliminary Findings PurposeThe purpose of this investigation was to describe age- and consistency-related changes in the temporal characteristics of chewing in typically developing children between the ages of 4 and 35 months and adults using high-resolution optically based motion capture technology.MethodData were collected from 60 participants (48 children, 12 adults) across 5 ... Article
Article  |   April 01, 2012
A Kinematic Description of the Temporal Characteristics of Jaw Motion for Early Chewing: Preliminary Findings
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Erin M. Wilson
    Waisman Center, University of Wisconsin—Madison
  • Jordan R. Green
    University of Nebraska—Lincoln
  • Gary Weismer
    University of Wisconsin—Madison
  • Correspondence to Erin M. Wilson: emhillman@wisc.edu
  • Editor: Anne Smith
    Editor: Anne Smith×
  • Associate Editor: David McFarland
    Associate Editor: David McFarland×
Article Information
Swallowing, Dysphagia & Feeding Disorders / Speech
Article   |   April 01, 2012
A Kinematic Description of the Temporal Characteristics of Jaw Motion for Early Chewing: Preliminary Findings
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 2012, Vol. 55, 626-638. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2011/10-0236)
History: Received August 26, 2010 , Revised February 4, 2011 , Accepted August 30, 2011
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 2012, Vol. 55, 626-638. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2011/10-0236)
History: Received August 26, 2010; Revised February 4, 2011; Accepted August 30, 2011
Web of Science® Times Cited: 9

PurposeThe purpose of this investigation was to describe age- and consistency-related changes in the temporal characteristics of chewing in typically developing children between the ages of 4 and 35 months and adults using high-resolution optically based motion capture technology.

MethodData were collected from 60 participants (48 children, 12 adults) across 5 age ranges (beginners, 7 months, 12 months, 35 months, and adults); each age group included 12 participants. Three different food consistencies were trialed as appropriate. The data were analyzed to assess changes in chewing rate, chewing sequence duration, and estimated number of chewing cycles.

ResultsThe results revealed both age- and consistency-related changes in chewing rate, sequence duration, and estimated number of chewing cycles, with consistency differences affecting masticatory timing in children as young as 7 months of age. Chewing rate varied as a function of age and consistency, and chewing sequence duration was shorter for adults than for children regardless of consistency type. In addition, the results from the estimated number of chewing cycles measure suggest that chewing effectiveness increased with age; this measure was also dependent on consistency type.

ConclusionsThe findings suggest that the different temporal chewing variables follow distinct developmental trajectories and are consistency dependent in children as young as 7 months of age. Clinical implications are detailed.

Acknowledgments
This project received funding and support from National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders Grants R03 DC004643, T32 DC05359, F31 DC006337, and R01 DC006463; National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Grant T32 HD07489; and a New Century Scholars Grant awarded to the first author by the American Speech-Language-Hearing Foundation.
We would also like to acknowledge Lindsey Frederixon, Jimin Lee, Andrea Kettler, and Katherine Rogers for their assistance with data analysis; Daniel Bolt for statistical consultation; Chelsea Price for assistance with article preparation; Erin M. Major for her clinical expertise; and the children and their families for their participation.
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