Article  |   April 2012
Auditory Long Latency Responses to Tonal and Speech Stimuli
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Shannon Swink
    East Carolina University, Greenville, NC
  • Andrew Stuart
    East Carolina University, Greenville, NC
  • Correspondence to Andrew Stuart: stuarta@ecu.edu
  • Shannon Swink is now at John E. Sexton & Associates, New Bern, NC.
    Shannon Swink is now at John E. Sexton & Associates, New Bern, NC.×
  • Editor: Sid Bacon
    Editor: Sid Bacon×
  • Associate Editor: Paul Abbas
    Associate Editor: Paul Abbas×
Speech, Voice & Prosody / Hearing
Article   |   April 2012
Auditory Long Latency Responses to Tonal and Speech Stimuli
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research April 2012, Vol.55, 447-459. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2011/10-0364)
History: Accepted 06 Jul 2011 , Received 28 Dec 2010 , Revised 25 Apr 2011
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research April 2012, Vol.55, 447-459. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2011/10-0364)
History: Accepted 06 Jul 2011 , Received 28 Dec 2010 , Revised 25 Apr 2011

Purpose: The effects of type of stimuli (i.e., nonspeech vs. speech), speech (i.e., natural vs. synthetic), gender of speaker and listener, speaker (i.e., self vs. other), and frequency alteration in self-produced speech on the late auditory cortical evoked potential were examined.

Method: Young adult men (n = 15) and women (n = 15), all with normal hearing, participated. P1–N1–P2 components were evoked with the following stimuli: 723-Hz tone bursts; naturally produced male and female /a/ tokens; synthetic male and female /a/ tokens; an /a/ token self-produced by each participant; and the same /a/ token produced by the participant but with a shift in frequency.

Results: In general, P1–N1–P2 component latencies were significantly shorter when evoked with the tonal stimulus versus speech stimuli and natural versus synthetic speech (p < .05). Women had significantly shorter latencies for only the P2 component (p < .05). For the tonal versus speech stimuli, P1 amplitudes were significantly smaller, and N1 and P2 amplitudes were significantly larger (p < .05). There was no significant effect of gender on the P1, N1, or P2 amplitude (p > .05).

Conclusion: These findings are consistent with the notion that spectrotemporal characteristics of nonspeech and speech stimuli affect P1–N1–P2 latency and amplitude components.

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