Article  |   April 2012
Predicting Later Language Outcomes From the Language Use Inventory
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Diane Pesco
    Concordia University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada
  • Daniela K. O’Neill
    University of Waterloo, Ontario, Canada
  • Correspondence to Diane Pesco: dpesco@education.concordia.ca
  • Editor: Janna Oetting
    Editor: Janna Oetting×
  • Associate Editor: Elizabeth Crais
    Associate Editor: Elizabeth Crais×
Article Information
Development / Language Disorders / Social Communication & Pragmatics Disorders / Language
Article   |   April 2012
Predicting Later Language Outcomes From the Language Use Inventory
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 2012, Vol. 55, 421-434. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2011/10-0273)
History: Received October 5, 2010 , Revised May 2, 2011 , Accepted August 29, 2011
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, April 2012, Vol. 55, 421-434. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2011/10-0273)
History: Received October 5, 2010; Revised May 2, 2011; Accepted August 29, 2011
Web of Science® Times Cited: 1

Purpose: To examine the predictive validity of the Language Use Inventory (LUI), a parent report of language use by children 18–47 months old (O’Neill, 2009).

Method: 348 children whose parents had completed the LUI were reassessed at 5–6 years old with standardized, norm-referenced language measures and parent report of developmental history. The relationship between scores on the LUI and later measures was examined through correlation, binary classification, and receiver operating characteristic curve analysis.

Results: For children aged 24–47 months at the time of LUI completion, LUI scores correlated significantly with language measure scores. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), and negative predictive value (NPV) were also calculated for 4 cutoff scores on the LUI, including −1.64 SD, a score that maximized sensitivity to 81% and specificity to 93%. For children aged 18–23 months at the time of LUI completion, specificity and NPV were high, but sensitivity and PPV were lower than desirable.

Conclusions: The results provide initial support for the LUI’s predictive validity, particularly for children 24–47 months, and suggest the LUI can serve as an indicator of later language outcomes in referred populations. The results compare favorably to findings for other early child-language measures.

Acknowledgments
This work was made possible by a 2006–2009 grant from the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR). The authors gratefully acknowledge Mare Appleby and Jillian Spratt for their research assistance, Mary Thompson at the University of Waterloo for statistical consulting, and the many families and children who participated in the study.
The second author is the author of the Language Use Inventory (LUI) and has a financial interest in the form of ownership in Knowledge in Development, Inc., the company that publishes the LUI. This financial interest is applicable as of 2009 when the company was founded. The research presented in this article was designed and conducted prior to 2009 and was wholly funded by a 3-year grant awarded in 2006 to Daniela O’Neill (PI) and Diane Pesco (co-investigator) by CIHR. The first author was the lead investigator for the design and execution of the study and the statistical analysis of the results presented in this paper. She has no financial interest in the LUI or its publisher.
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