Measurement of Phonated Intervals During Four Fluency-Inducing Conditions Purpose Previous investigations of persons who stutter have demonstrated changes in vocalization variables during fluency-inducing conditions (FICs). A series of studies has also shown that a reduction in short intervals of phonation, those from 30 to 200 ms, is associated with decreased stuttering. The purpose of this study, therefore, was ... Research Article
Research Article  |   February 01, 2009
Measurement of Phonated Intervals During Four Fluency-Inducing Conditions
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Jason H. Davidow
    Hofstra University, Long Island, NY
  • Anne K. Bothe
    The University of Georgia, Athens
  • Richard D. Andreatta
    University of Kentucky, Lexington
  • Jun Ye
    The University of Georgia
  • Contact author: Jason H. Davidow, Department of Speech-Language-Hearing Sciences, 100B Davison Hall, Hofstra University, Hempstead, NY 11549. E-mail: jason.davidow@hofstra.edu.
  • Jun Ye is now at Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston.
    Jun Ye is now at Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston.×
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Fluency Disorders / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Speech / Research Articles
Research Article   |   February 01, 2009
Measurement of Phonated Intervals During Four Fluency-Inducing Conditions
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 2009, Vol. 52, 188-205. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2008/07-0040)
History: Received February 16, 2007 , Revised September 26, 2007 , Accepted April 13, 2008
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 2009, Vol. 52, 188-205. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2008/07-0040)
History: Received February 16, 2007; Revised September 26, 2007; Accepted April 13, 2008
Web of Science® Times Cited: 18

Purpose Previous investigations of persons who stutter have demonstrated changes in vocalization variables during fluency-inducing conditions (FICs). A series of studies has also shown that a reduction in short intervals of phonation, those from 30 to 200 ms, is associated with decreased stuttering. The purpose of this study, therefore, was to test the hypothesis that the distribution of phonated intervals (PIs) should change during 4 of the most well-known FICs.

Method A repeated-measures design was used to explore the relationship between PIs and stuttering during 4 FICs: chorus reading, prolonged speech, singing, and rhythmic stimulation. Most conditions were conducted at 2 different speech rates. The distribution of PIs was measured during these conditions and was compared with PI distributions obtained during control conditions.

Results Overall PI distributions were significantly different during all 4 FICs, as compared with control conditions. PIs in the range of 30–150 ms were reduced across all FICs, at all speech rates.

Conclusion These results provide further evidence of the importance of phonation variables to (a) our understanding of how FICs may operate and (b) the treatment of stuttering. These findings, along with previous studies that showed how purposefully reducing the number of short PIs resulted in the elimination of stuttering, suggest that treatment programs based on prolonged speech—or PIs, in particular—may benefit from emphasizing a reduction in the number of short PIs and a simultaneous increase in the number of longer PIs.

Acknowledgments
The authors would like to thank Roger Ingham, Joy Hutcherson, Jenna Levy, Robin Bramlett, and T. J. Ragan for their assistance and support in preparing this article.
Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access