Quality of Life for Children With Cochlear Implants: Perceived Benefits and Problems and the Perception of Single Words and Emotional Sounds Purpose This study examined children’s self-reported quality of life with a cochlear implant as related to children’s actual perceptions of speech and the emotional information conveyed by sound. Effects of age at amplification with hearing aids and fitting of cochlear implants on perceived quality of life were also investigated. ... Research Article
Research Article  |   February 01, 2009
Quality of Life for Children With Cochlear Implants: Perceived Benefits and Problems and the Perception of Single Words and Emotional Sounds
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Efrat A. Schorr
    University of Maryland, College Park
  • Froma P. Roth
    University of Maryland, College Park
  • Nathan A. Fox
    University of Maryland, College Park
  • Contact author: Efrat A. Schorr, who is now at The Dr. Maurine Kessler Auditory Verbal Education Center, A.V. Israel, Beit Turkiz 33 Pierre Koenig Street, Suite 502, Jerusalem 93469, Israel. E-mail: cistudy@yahoo.com.
Article Information
Hearing Aids, Cochlear Implants & Assistive Technology / Hearing / Research Articles
Research Article   |   February 01, 2009
Quality of Life for Children With Cochlear Implants: Perceived Benefits and Problems and the Perception of Single Words and Emotional Sounds
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 2009, Vol. 52, 141-152. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2008/07-0213)
History: Received September 12, 2007 , Revised February 18, 2008 , Accepted June 16, 2008
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 2009, Vol. 52, 141-152. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2008/07-0213)
History: Received September 12, 2007; Revised February 18, 2008; Accepted June 16, 2008
Web of Science® Times Cited: 33

Purpose This study examined children’s self-reported quality of life with a cochlear implant as related to children’s actual perceptions of speech and the emotional information conveyed by sound. Effects of age at amplification with hearing aids and fitting of cochlear implants on perceived quality of life were also investigated.

Method A self-reported quality of life questionnaire and assessments of speech perception (single words) and emotion identification were administered to a sample of 37 children with cochlear implants who were congenitally deaf, who were 5–14 years of age, and who all used spoken language.

Results The children reported significant improvement in quality of life because of their cochlear implants, and they also reported low levels of concern about typical problems associated with wearing an implant. The children’s perceived quality of life did not significantly predict speech perception performance at the single word level. In contrast, increased quality of life predicted better performance on the emotion identification task. Age at first use of amplification predicted perceived quality of life.

Conclusions The findings regarding age reinforce the importance of early detection and intervention for children’s positive quality of life with cochlear implants later in childhood.

Acknowledgments
This research was supported by National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders (NIDCD) National Research Service Award 1-F31DC006204-02 to Efrat A. Schorr and by a grant from the American Hearing Research Foundation (Eugene L. Derlacki, M.D. Grant for Excellence in the Field of Hearing) to Nathan A. Fox and Efrat A. Schorr.
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