Voiced Initial Consonant Perception Deficits in Older Listeners With Hearing Loss and Good and Poor Word Recognition Purpose This study examined differences in voiced consonant–vowel (CV) perception in older listeners with normal hearing and in 2 groups of older listeners with matched hearing losses: those with good and those with poor word recognition scores. Method Thirty-six participants identified CVs from an 8-item display from the ... Research Article
Research Article  |   February 01, 2009
Voiced Initial Consonant Perception Deficits in Older Listeners With Hearing Loss and Good and Poor Word Recognition
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Susan L. Phillips
    University of North Carolina at Greensboro
  • Scott J. Richter
    University of North Carolina at Greensboro
  • David McPherson
    Brigham Young University, Provo, UT
  • Contact author: Susan L. Phillips, 300 Ferguson Building, P.O. Box 26170, University of North Carolina at Greensboro, Greensboro, NC 27402-6170. E-mail: slphilli@uncg.edu.
Article Information
Hearing Disorders / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Hearing / Research Articles
Research Article   |   February 01, 2009
Voiced Initial Consonant Perception Deficits in Older Listeners With Hearing Loss and Good and Poor Word Recognition
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 2009, Vol. 52, 118-129. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2008/07-0228)
History: Received October 2, 2007 , Revised February 15, 2008 , Accepted May 6, 2008
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 2009, Vol. 52, 118-129. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2008/07-0228)
History: Received October 2, 2007; Revised February 15, 2008; Accepted May 6, 2008
Web of Science® Times Cited: 2

Purpose This study examined differences in voiced consonant–vowel (CV) perception in older listeners with normal hearing and in 2 groups of older listeners with matched hearing losses: those with good and those with poor word recognition scores.

Method Thirty-six participants identified CVs from an 8-item display from the natural voiced initial consonants /b, d, g, m, n, ð, v and z/ in three vowel contexts (/a, o, u/) spoken by a male and a female talker.

Results The listeners with hearing loss and poor word recognition scores (WRS) made more of the same types of errors, as well as errors not made by listeners with hearing loss and good word recognition. Errors above chance rates for these listeners were highest in the context of /a/ and were similar in the contexts of /o/ and /u/. Sequential information analyses (SINFAs) verified that information was transmitted least efficiently in the context of /a/. The results yielded a list of consonant confusions unique to listeners with poor WRS.

Conclusions Listeners with poor WRS have more difficulty identifying voiced initial consonants in CV syllables than do listeners with good WRS. These listeners made some systematic errors, but most errors were nonsystematic, perhaps due to the low level of feature information transmitted.

Acknowledgments
This research was supported by National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders Grant R03-DC004948 01. We thank Karma Bullock and Diane Eshleman for their assistance in data collection.
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