Complementing Behavioral Measures With Electrophysiological Measures in Diagnostic Evaluation: A Case Study in Two Languages This case study focuses on a bilingual, older man who spoke Polish and English and showed weaknesses on clinical measures of dichotic listening in English. It was unclear whether these test results were influenced by the participant’s facility with his second language or by other nonauditory factors. To elucidate the ... Case Study
Case Study  |   June 01, 2006
Complementing Behavioral Measures With Electrophysiological Measures in Diagnostic Evaluation: A Case Study in Two Languages
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Jeffrey S. Martin
    The University of Texas at Dallas
  • James F. Jerger
    The University of Texas at Dallas
  • Hanna K. Ulatowska
    The University of Texas at Dallas
  • Jyutika A. Mehta
    The University of Texas at Dallas
  • Contact author: James Jerger, 2612 East Prairie Creek Drive, Richardson, TX 75080-2679. Email: jjerger@utdallas.edu
Article Information
Hearing Disorders / Special Populations / Cultural & Linguistic Diversity / Older Adults & Aging / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Hearing / Case Study
Case Study   |   June 01, 2006
Complementing Behavioral Measures With Electrophysiological Measures in Diagnostic Evaluation: A Case Study in Two Languages
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 2006, Vol. 49, 603-615. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2006/043)
History: Received February 2, 2005 , Accepted September 20, 2005
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, June 2006, Vol. 49, 603-615. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2006/043)
History: Received February 2, 2005; Accepted September 20, 2005
Web of Science® Times Cited: 1

This case study focuses on a bilingual, older man who spoke Polish and English and showed weaknesses on clinical measures of dichotic listening in English. It was unclear whether these test results were influenced by the participant’s facility with his second language or by other nonauditory factors. To elucidate the nature of this deficit, the authors examined behavioral and electrophysiological responses during dichotic-listening tasks involving linguistic processing in both languages. A diotic (control) condition was included to examine whether nonauditory factors, such as language familiarity, memory, or decline in speed of mental processing, might explain the dichotic results. The results from this participant were compared with those obtained from a bilingual young adult who also spoke both Polish and English. Results showed a substantial left-ear deficit for the older individual on both behavioral and electrophysiological measures of dichotic listening. The pattern of results is consistent with previous findings in demonstrating that the left-ear deficit in this patient derived from an auditory-specific defect rather than from any of the extra-auditory factors associated with language facility or cognitive decline.

Acknowledgments
We are grateful to Gary Overson and Gail Tillman for their valuable contributions to these experiments.
Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access