The Effects of Short-Term Computerized Speech-in-Noise Training on Postlingually Deafened Adult Cochlear Implant Recipients PurposeTo determine if short-term computerized speech-in-noise training can produce significant improvements in speech-in-noise perception by cochlear implant (CI) recipients on standardized audiologic testing measures.MethodFive adult postlingually deafened CI recipients participated in 4 speech-in-noise training sessions using the Seeing and Hearing Speech program (Sensimetrics; Malden, MA). Each participant completed lessons concentrating ... Research Note
Research Note  |   February 01, 2013
The Effects of Short-Term Computerized Speech-in-Noise Training on Postlingually Deafened Adult Cochlear Implant Recipients
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Erin M. Ingvalson
    Northwestern University, Evanston, IL
  • Brienne Lee
    Northwestern University, Evanston, IL
  • Pamela Fiebig
    The Chinese University of Hong Kong
  • Patrick C. M. Wong
    Northwestern University, Evanston, IL
  • Correspondence to Erin M. Ingvalson: ingvalson@northwestern.edu
  • Editor: Sid Bacon
    Editor: Sid Bacon×
  • Associate Editor: Eric Healy
    Associate Editor: Eric Healy×
Article Information
Hearing Disorders / Hearing Aids, Cochlear Implants & Assistive Technology / Hearing
Research Note   |   February 01, 2013
The Effects of Short-Term Computerized Speech-in-Noise Training on Postlingually Deafened Adult Cochlear Implant Recipients
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 2013, Vol. 56, 81-88. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2012/11-0291)
History: Received October 27, 2011 , Revised March 8, 2012 , Accepted May 29, 2012
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 2013, Vol. 56, 81-88. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2012/11-0291)
History: Received October 27, 2011; Revised March 8, 2012; Accepted May 29, 2012
Web of Science® Times Cited: 12

PurposeTo determine if short-term computerized speech-in-noise training can produce significant improvements in speech-in-noise perception by cochlear implant (CI) recipients on standardized audiologic testing measures.

MethodFive adult postlingually deafened CI recipients participated in 4 speech-in-noise training sessions using the Seeing and Hearing Speech program (Sensimetrics; Malden, MA). Each participant completed lessons concentrating on consonant and vowel recognition at word, phrase, and sentence levels. Speech-in-noise abilities were assessed using the QuickSIN (Killion, Niquette, Gudmundsen, Revit, & Banerjee, 2004) and the Hearing in Noise Test (HINT (Nilsson, Soli & Sullivan, 1994)).

ResultsAll listeners significantly improved key word identification on the HINT after training, albeit only at the most favorable signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). Listeners also showed a significant reduction in the degree of SNR loss on the QuickSIN after training.

ConclusionShort-term speech-in-noise training may improve speech-in-noise perception in postlingually deafened adult CI recipients.

Acknowledgments
This research was funded by National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders Grant R01-DC008333, NIA Grant K02-AG03582, and National Science Foundation Grant BCS-1125144. We thank Susan Erler and the Northwestern University Doctor of Audiology Program for supporting this study and Pat Zurek of Sensimetrics for answering our questions about the program.
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