Enhancing Communication Through Gesture and Naming Therapy PurposeIn this study, the authors investigated whether gesture, naming, and strategic treatment improved the communication skills of 14 people with severe aphasia.MethodAll participants received 15 hr of gesture and naming treatment (reported in a companion article [Marshall et al., 2012 ]). Half the group received a further 15 hr of strategic ... Article
Article  |   February 01, 2013
Enhancing Communication Through Gesture and Naming Therapy
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Anna Caute
    City University London, United Kingdom
  • Tim Pring
    City University London, United Kingdom
  • Naomi Cocks
    City University London, United Kingdom
  • Madeline Cruice
    City University London, United Kingdom
  • Wendy Best
    University College London
  • Jane Marshall
    City University London, United Kingdom
  • Correspondence to Jane Marshall: J.Marshall@city.ac.uk
  • Editor: Janna Oetting
    Editor: Janna Oetting×
  • Associate Editor: Margaret Blake
    Associate Editor: Margaret Blake×
Article Information
Language Disorders / Aphasia / Language
Article   |   February 01, 2013
Enhancing Communication Through Gesture and Naming Therapy
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 2013, Vol. 56, 337-351. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2012/11-0232)
History: Received August 21, 2011 , Revised January 30, 2012 , Accepted June 24, 2012
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 2013, Vol. 56, 337-351. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2012/11-0232)
History: Received August 21, 2011; Revised January 30, 2012; Accepted June 24, 2012
Web of Science® Times Cited: 10

PurposeIn this study, the authors investigated whether gesture, naming, and strategic treatment improved the communication skills of 14 people with severe aphasia.

MethodAll participants received 15 hr of gesture and naming treatment (reported in a companion article [Marshall et al., 2012 ]). Half the group received a further 15 hr of strategic therapy, whereas the remaining 7 participants received no further input. The effects of therapy on communication were assessed with 2 novel measures. These measures required each participant to convey simple messages and narratives to his or her communication partner. In both assessments, a subset of the stimuli featured items that had been targets in gesture or naming treatment.

ResultsPerformance on the communication measures was stable over 2 baseline assessments but improved after gesture and naming treatment. Those participants who received additional strategic therapy made further gains on the message but not on the narrative task. Communication gains were not specific to the stimuli featuring trained items.

ConclusionsThis study suggests that gesture and naming treatments can benefit interactive communication. The additional benefits of strategic therapy were less clear-cut but did have an impact on the transmission of simple messages. Gains seem to reflect the development of general communication skills rather than the use of trained gestures and/or words.

Acknowledgments
This study was funded by the Stroke Association Grant TSA 2006/4. We thank the participants, their partners, and the healthy controls. Members of Bury Speakeasy served on our advisory group, which was led by Gill Pearl. Ben Roberts, Bernard Camilleri, Jerry McCombie, and Lucy Geraldine Main helped prepare the assessment materials. Andrew Ford helped create the project website.
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