Real-Word and Nonword Repetition in Italian-Speaking Children With Specific Language Impairment: A Study of Diagnostic Accuracy PurposeUsing 2 different scoring methods, the authors examined the diagnostic accuracy of both real-word and nonword repetition in identifying Italian-speaking children with and without specific language impairment (SLI).MethodA total of 34 children ages 3;11–5;8 (years;months) participated—17 children with SLI and 17 typically developing children matched for age (TD–A children). Children ... Article
Article  |   February 01, 2013
Real-Word and Nonword Repetition in Italian-Speaking Children With Specific Language Impairment: A Study of Diagnostic Accuracy
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Marco Dispaldro
    Università di Padova, Padova, Italy
  • Laurence B. Leonard
    Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN
  • Patricia Deevy
    Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN
  • Correspondence to Marco Dispaldro: marco.dispaldro@unipd.it
  • Editor: Jann Oetting
    Editor: Jann Oetting×
  • Associate Editor: Marc Joanisse
    Associate Editor: Marc Joanisse×
Article Information
Special Populations / Cultural & Linguistic Diversity / Language Disorders / Specific Language Impairment / Language
Article   |   February 01, 2013
Real-Word and Nonword Repetition in Italian-Speaking Children With Specific Language Impairment: A Study of Diagnostic Accuracy
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 2013, Vol. 56, 323-336. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2012/11-0304)
History: Received November 7, 2011 , Revised April 19, 2012 , Accepted June 18, 2012
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 2013, Vol. 56, 323-336. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2012/11-0304)
History: Received November 7, 2011; Revised April 19, 2012; Accepted June 18, 2012
Web of Science® Times Cited: 18

PurposeUsing 2 different scoring methods, the authors examined the diagnostic accuracy of both real-word and nonword repetition in identifying Italian-speaking children with and without specific language impairment (SLI).

MethodA total of 34 children ages 3;11–5;8 (years;months) participated—17 children with SLI and 17 typically developing children matched for age (TD–A children). Children completed real-word and nonword repetition tasks. The capacity of real-word and nonword repetition tasks to discriminate children with SLI from TD–A was examined through binary logistic regression and receiver operating characteristic curves.

ResultsBoth real-word and nonword repetition showed good (or excellent) sensitivity and specificity in distinguishing children with SLI from their TD peers.

ConclusionsNonword repetition appears to be a useful diagnostic indicator for Italian, as in other languages. In addition, real-word repetition also holds promise. The contributions of each type of measure are discussed.

Acknowledgments
We are grateful to the children who participated in the study and their parents who gave their consent. We thank Francesca Scali for her help in data collection and Maura Messina for her reliability scoring. Finally, we thank the schools and the Health Services for their cooperation.
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