Auditory Brainstem Response to Complex Sounds Predicts Self-Reported Speech-in-Noise Performance PurposeTo compare the ability of the auditory brainstem response to complex sounds (cABR) to predict subjective ratings of speech understanding in noise on the Speech, Spatial, and Qualities of Hearing Scale (SSQ; Gatehouse & Noble, 2004) relative to the predictive ability of the Quick Speech-in-Noise test (QuickSIN; Killion, Niquette, Gudmundsen, ... Article
Article  |   February 01, 2013
Auditory Brainstem Response to Complex Sounds Predicts Self-Reported Speech-in-Noise Performance
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Samira Anderson
    Auditory Neuroscience Laboratory, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL
  • Alexandra Parbery-Clark
    Auditory Neuroscience Laboratory, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL
  • Travis White-Schwoch
    Auditory Neuroscience Laboratory, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL
  • Nina Kraus
    Auditory Neuroscience Laboratory, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL
  • Correspondence to Samira Anderson, who is now with the Department of Hearing and Speech Sciences, University of Maryland: sander22@umd.edu
  • Editor: Sid Bacon
    Editor: Sid Bacon×
  • Associate Editor: Paul Abbas
    Associate Editor: Paul Abbas×
Article Information
Hearing Disorders / Hearing
Article   |   February 01, 2013
Auditory Brainstem Response to Complex Sounds Predicts Self-Reported Speech-in-Noise Performance
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 2013, Vol. 56, 31-43. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2012/12-0043)
History: Received January 31, 2012 , Accepted June 5, 2012
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 2013, Vol. 56, 31-43. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2012/12-0043)
History: Received January 31, 2012; Accepted June 5, 2012
Web of Science® Times Cited: 25

PurposeTo compare the ability of the auditory brainstem response to complex sounds (cABR) to predict subjective ratings of speech understanding in noise on the Speech, Spatial, and Qualities of Hearing Scale (SSQ; Gatehouse & Noble, 2004) relative to the predictive ability of the Quick Speech-in-Noise test (QuickSIN; Killion, Niquette, Gudmundsen, Revit, & Banerjee, 2004) and pure-tone hearing thresholds.

MethodParticipants included 111 middle- to older-age adults (range = 45–78) with audiometric configurations ranging from normal hearing levels to moderate sensorineural hearing loss. In addition to using audiometric testing, the authors also used such evaluation measures as the QuickSIN, the SSQ, and the cABR.

ResultsMultiple linear regression analysis indicated that the inclusion of brainstem variables in a model with QuickSIN, hearing thresholds, and age accounted for 30% of the variance in the Speech subtest of the SSQ, compared with significantly less variance (19%) when brainstem variables were not included.

ConclusionThe authors' results demonstrate the cABR’s efficacy for predicting self-reported speech-in-noise perception difficulties. The fact that the cABR predicts more variance in self-reported speech-in-noise (SIN) perception than either the QuickSIN or hearing thresholds indicates that the cABR provides additional insight into an individual’s ability to hear in background noise. In addition, the findings underscore the link between the cABR and hearing in noise.

Acknowledgments
This work was supported by an NUCATS Institute CTI Pilot Grant Proposal, National Institutes of Health Grant T32 DC009399-01A10, and by the Knowles Hearing Center. We thank the participants who graciously participated in our testing. We also thank Sarah Drehobl, Jane Hornickel, Trent Nicol, and Karen Chan for their critical review and comments on the article and Sarah Anderson for her assistance with the statistical analysis. We acknowledge the work of Erika Skoe and Sumitrajit Dhar in developing the MATLAB routine and stimulus compensation protocol.
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