Further Evidence of Auditory Extinction in Aphasia PurposePreliminary research (Shisler, 2005) suggests that auditory extinction in individuals with aphasia (IWA) may be connected to binding and attention. In this study, the authors expanded on previous findings on auditory extinction to determine the source of extinction deficits in IWA.MethodSeventeen IWA (Mage = 53.19 years) and 17 neurologically intact ... Article
Article  |   February 01, 2013
Further Evidence of Auditory Extinction in Aphasia
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Rebecca Shisler Marshall
    University of Georgia, Athens
  • Alexandra Basilakos
    University of Georgia, Athens
  • Kim Love-Myers
    University of Georgia, Athens
  • Correspondence to Rebecca Shisler Marshall: rshisler@uga.edu
  • Editor: Janna Oetting
    Editor: Janna Oetting×
  • Associate Editor: Margaret Blake
    Associate Editor: Margaret Blake×
Article Information
Language Disorders / Aphasia / Language
Article   |   February 01, 2013
Further Evidence of Auditory Extinction in Aphasia
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 2013, Vol. 56, 236-249. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2012/11-0191)
History: Received July 19, 2011 , Revised December 3, 2011 , Accepted May 25, 2012
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 2013, Vol. 56, 236-249. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2012/11-0191)
History: Received July 19, 2011; Revised December 3, 2011; Accepted May 25, 2012

PurposePreliminary research (Shisler, 2005) suggests that auditory extinction in individuals with aphasia (IWA) may be connected to binding and attention. In this study, the authors expanded on previous findings on auditory extinction to determine the source of extinction deficits in IWA.

MethodSeventeen IWA (Mage = 53.19 years) and 17 neurologically intact controls (Mage = 55.18 years) participated. Auditory stimuli were spoken letters presented in a free-field listening environment. Stimuli were presented in single-stimulus stimulation (SSS) or double-simultaneous stimulation (DSS) trials across 5 conditions designed to determine whether extinction is related to binding, inefficient attention resource allocation, or overall deficits in attention. All participants completed all experimental conditions.

ResultsSignificant extinction was demonstrated only by IWA when sounds were different, providing further evidence of auditory extinction. However, binding requirements did not appear to influence the IWA’s performance.

ConclusionsResults indicate that, for IWA, auditory extinction may not be attributed to a binding deficit or inefficient attention resource allocation because of equivalent performance across all 5 conditions. Rather, overall attentional resources may be influential. Future research in aphasia should explore the effect of the stimulus presentation in addition to the continued study of attention treatment.

Acknowledgments
Generous funding by National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders Grant 5R03DC5128-2 supported this work. Additional gratitude is extended to the participants for their time and to the speech–language pathologists and graduate students who helped with recruitment.
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