The Impacts of Language Background and Language-Related Disorders in Auditory Processing Assessment PurposeTo examine the impact of language background and language-related disorders (LRDs—dyslexia and/or language impairment) on performance in English speech and nonspeech tests of auditory processing (AP) commonly used in the clinic.MethodA clinical database concerning 133 multilingual children (mostly with English as an additional language) and 71 monolingual children (7- to ... Article
Article  |   February 01, 2013
The Impacts of Language Background and Language-Related Disorders in Auditory Processing Assessment
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Jenny Hooi Yin Loo
    National University Health System, Singapore
  • Doris-Eva Bamiou
    UCL Ear Institute, London, United Kingdom
  • Stuart Rosen
    UCL, London
  • Correspondence to Jenny Loo: jenny_loo@nuhs.edu.sg
  • Editor: Sid Bacon
    Editor: Sid Bacon×
  • Associate Editor: Dennis McFarland
    Associate Editor: Dennis McFarland×
Article Information
Hearing Disorders / Special Populations / Cultural & Linguistic Diversity / Language Disorders / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Hearing
Article   |   February 01, 2013
The Impacts of Language Background and Language-Related Disorders in Auditory Processing Assessment
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 2013, Vol. 56, 1-12. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2012/11-0068)
History: Received March 23, 2011 , Revised July 14, 2011 , Accepted May 31, 2012
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 2013, Vol. 56, 1-12. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2012/11-0068)
History: Received March 23, 2011; Revised July 14, 2011; Accepted May 31, 2012
Web of Science® Times Cited: 10

PurposeTo examine the impact of language background and language-related disorders (LRDs—dyslexia and/or language impairment) on performance in English speech and nonspeech tests of auditory processing (AP) commonly used in the clinic.

MethodA clinical database concerning 133 multilingual children (mostly with English as an additional language) and 71 monolingual children (7- to 12-year-old native English speakers) with listening concerns was analyzed retrospectively.

ResultsLanguage background had no significant effect on the 3 nonspeech AP tests, but the multilingual group performed worse in most of the speech tests. Children with LRDs generally performed more poorly than those without, except for the masking level difference.

ConclusionsAlthough language background affects performance in AP tasks that use speech, the effect of LRDs appears to be more wide-ranging insofar as the majority of the AP tests—speech and nonspeech—were significantly affected by their presence. The effects of language background are probably mediated directly through the effects of language expertise, whereas those associated with LRDs appear to arise from associated deficits in memory and attention. The vast majority of so-called AP tests tap abilities far beyond those typically thought of as specifically auditory; thus, they are poor measures of an AP disorder.

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