Effect of Onset and Rhyme Primes in Preschoolers With Typical Development and Specific Language Impairment PurposeIn this study, the authors used cued shadowing to examine children’s phonological word-form representations by studying the effects of onset and rhyme primes on lexical access.MethodTwenty-five preschoolers with specific language impairment (SLI; hereafter known as the SLI group), 24 age- and gender-matched children (AM group), and 20 vocabulary- and gender-matched ... Article
Article  |   February 01, 2012
Effect of Onset and Rhyme Primes in Preschoolers With Typical Development and Specific Language Impairment
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Shelley Gray
    Arizona State University, Tempe
  • Mark Reiser
    Arizona State University, Tempe
  • Shara Brinkley
    Arizona State University, Tempe
  • Correspondence to Shelley Gray: shelley.gray@asu.edu
  • Editor: Janna Oetting
    Editor: Janna Oetting×
  • Associate Editor: Marc Joanisse
    Associate Editor: Marc Joanisse×
Article Information
Development / Language Disorders / Specific Language Impairment / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Language
Article   |   February 01, 2012
Effect of Onset and Rhyme Primes in Preschoolers With Typical Development and Specific Language Impairment
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 2012, Vol. 55, 32-44. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2011/10-0203)
History: Received July 23, 2010 , Revised January 28, 2011 , Accepted June 11, 2011
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 2012, Vol. 55, 32-44. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2011/10-0203)
History: Received July 23, 2010; Revised January 28, 2011; Accepted June 11, 2011
Web of Science® Times Cited: 7

PurposeIn this study, the authors used cued shadowing to examine children’s phonological word-form representations by studying the effects of onset and rhyme primes on lexical access.

MethodTwenty-five preschoolers with specific language impairment (SLI; hereafter known as the SLI group), 24 age- and gender-matched children (AM group), and 20 vocabulary- and gender-matched children (VM group) participated. Children listened to pairs of words and repeated the second word as quickly as they could. Primes included words with overlapping onsets, words with overlapping rimes, and identical or unrelated words.

ResultsAs expected, unrelated words inhibited production in the AM and VM groups. Overlapping rimes primed production in the AM group. No inhibitory or priming effects were found for the SLI group.

ConclusionPhonological priming may be used to study the phonological representations of preschool-age children. Results suggest that none of the groups accessed words incrementally. Priming for overlapping rimes by the AM but not the VM or SLI groups may indicate that the AM group benefited from lexical organization favoring nucleus + rime organization that has not yet developed for the VM or SLI groups. The lack of inhibition in the SLI group suggests that their phonological representations were not detailed enough to prime words in their lexicon or that they did not process the prime or target words.

Acknowledgments
This research was supported by National Institutes on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders Grant 5R01DC7417-2, awarded to the first author. We sincerely appreciate the participation of children, families, and staff from schools in the Phoenix metropolitan area, including the Chandler Unified School District, Mesa Public Schools, Kyrene School District No. 28, Scottsdale Unified School District, Bright Horizons Family Solutions in Chandler and Tempe, Cactus Preschool in Tempe, the Campus Children’s Center, First Congregational Preschool, Fit N Fun Children’s Center, Little Explorer’s Preschool and Childcare, Maxwell Preschool Academy in Chandler, Success Center Family Child Care, Tempe Christian School, and Valley Children’s Center in Chandler.
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