Comments on Recent Developments in Stuttering Treatment Maintenance Research Using the Camperdown Program PurposeTo review the contribution of recent studies on the Camperdown Program (O’Brian, Onslow, Cream, & Packman, 2003) for treating stuttering in adolescents and adults toward the problem of maintenance of treatment benefits.MethodThe procedures employed in those studies are reviewed with respect to the use of performance-contingent maintenance schedules, including their ... Letter to the Editor
Letter to the Editor  |   February 01, 2012
Comments on Recent Developments in Stuttering Treatment Maintenance Research Using the Camperdown Program
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Roger J. Ingham
    University of California, Santa Barbara
  • Correspondence to Roger J. Ingham: rjingham@speech.ucsb.edu
  • Editor and Associate Editor: Anne Smith
    Editor and Associate Editor: Anne Smith×
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Fluency Disorders / Speech
Letter to the Editor   |   February 01, 2012
Comments on Recent Developments in Stuttering Treatment Maintenance Research Using the Camperdown Program
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 2012, Vol. 55, 306-309. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2011/11-0136)
History: Received June 1, 2011 , Revised August 2, 2011 , Accepted September 1, 2011
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 2012, Vol. 55, 306-309. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2011/11-0136)
History: Received June 1, 2011; Revised August 2, 2011; Accepted September 1, 2011
Web of Science® Times Cited: 4

PurposeTo review the contribution of recent studies on the Camperdown Program (O’Brian, Onslow, Cream, & Packman, 2003) for treating stuttering in adolescents and adults toward the problem of maintenance of treatment benefits.

MethodThe procedures employed in those studies are reviewed with respect to the use of performance-contingent maintenance schedules, including their recent use in conjunction with social anxiety modification.

ConclusionThe design of the recent studies of the Camperdown Program confounds the effects of maintenance strategies and treatment outcome evaluation, thereby obscuring their contribution toward resolving the problem of maintenance.

Acknowledgment
This letter was prepared with the support of National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders Grant RO1 DC007893, awarded to the author.
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