Perceptual Learning of Dysarthric Speech: A Review of Experimental Studies Purpose: This review article provides a theoretical overview of the characteristics of perceptual learning, reviews perceptual learning studies that pertain to dysarthric populations, and identifies directions for future research that consider the application of perceptual learning to the management of dysarthria.Method: A critical review of the literature was ... Review
Review  |   February 2012
Perceptual Learning of Dysarthric Speech: A Review of Experimental Studies
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Stephanie A. Borrie
    University of Canterbury, Christchurch, New Zealand
    University of Canterbury, Christchurch, New Zealand
  • Megan J. McAuliffe
    University of Canterbury, Christchurch, New Zealand
    University of Canterbury, Christchurch, New Zealand
  • Julie M. Liss
    Arizona State University, Tempe
    Arizona State University, Tempe
  • Correspondence to Stephanie Borrie: steph.borrie@gmail.com
  • Stephanie A. Borrie is currently a postdoctoral fellow affiliated with the Department of Speech and Hearing Science, Arizona State University, Tempe.
    Stephanie A. Borrie is currently a postdoctoral fellow affiliated with the Department of Speech and Hearing Science, Arizona State University, Tempe.×
  • Editor: Anne Smith
    Editor: Anne Smith×
  • Associate Editor: Wolfram Ziegler
    Associate Editor: Wolfram Ziegler×
  • © 2012 American Speech-Language-Hearing AssociationAmerican Speech-Language-Hearing Association
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Dysarthria / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Speech
Review   |   February 2012
Perceptual Learning of Dysarthric Speech: A Review of Experimental Studies
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 2012, Vol. 55, 290-305. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2011/10-0349)
History: Received December 12, 2010 , Accepted June 20, 2011
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 2012, Vol. 55, 290-305. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2011/10-0349)
History: Received December 12, 2010; Accepted June 20, 2011
Web of Science® Times Cited: 7

Purpose: This review article provides a theoretical overview of the characteristics of perceptual learning, reviews perceptual learning studies that pertain to dysarthric populations, and identifies directions for future research that consider the application of perceptual learning to the management of dysarthria.

Method: A critical review of the literature was conducted that summarized and synthesized previously published research in the area of perceptual learning with atypical speech. Literature related to perceptual learning of neurologically degraded speech was emphasized with the aim of identifying key directions for future research with this population.

Conclusions: Familiarization with unfamiliar or ambiguous speech signals can facilitate perceptual learning of that same speech signal. There is a small but growing body of evidence that perceptual learning also occurs for listeners familiarized with dysarthric speech. Perceptual learning of the dysarthric signal is both theoretically and clinically significant. In order to establish the efficacy of exploiting perceptual learning paradigms for rehabilitative gain in dysarthria management, research is required to build on existing empirical evidence and develop a theoretical framework for learning to better recognize neurologically degraded speech.

Acknowledgments
Primary support for this manuscript was provided by a University of Canterbury Doctoral Scholarship (awarded to the first author). We also gratefully acknowledge support from New Zealand Neurological Foundation Grant 0827-PG and Health Research Council of New Zealand Grant HRC09/251 (both awarded to the second author) as well as National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders Grant R01 DC 6859 (awarded to the third author).
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