The Influence of Stimulus Taste and Chemesthesis on Tongue Movement Timing in Swallowing PurposeTo explore the influence of taste and trigeminal irritation (chemesthesis) on durational aspects of tongue movement in liquid swallowing, controlling for the influence of perceived taste intensity.MethodElectromagnetic midsagittal articulography was used to trace tongue movements during discrete liquid swallowing with 5 liquids: water, 3 moderate concentration tastants without odor (sweet, ... Article
Article  |   February 01, 2012
The Influence of Stimulus Taste and Chemesthesis on Tongue Movement Timing in Swallowing
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Catriona M. Steele
    Toronto Rehabilitation Institute, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
    Toronto Rehabilitation Institute, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
  • Pascal H. H. M. van Lieshout
    Toronto Rehabilitation Institute, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
    Toronto Rehabilitation Institute, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
  • Cathy A. Pelletier
    Walter Reed Army Medical Center, Washington, DC
    Walter Reed Army Medical Center, Washington, DC
  • Correspondence to Catriona M. Steele: steele.catriona@torontorehab.on.ca
  • Editor: Anne Smith
    Editor: Anne Smith×
  • Associate Editor: Caryn Easterling
    Associate Editor: Caryn Easterling×
Article Information
Swallowing, Dysphagia & Feeding Disorders / Speech
Article   |   February 01, 2012
The Influence of Stimulus Taste and Chemesthesis on Tongue Movement Timing in Swallowing
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 2012, Vol. 55, 262-275. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2011/11-0012)
History: Received January 13, 2011 , Accepted June 9, 2011
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 2012, Vol. 55, 262-275. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2011/11-0012)
History: Received January 13, 2011; Accepted June 9, 2011
Web of Science® Times Cited: 6

PurposeTo explore the influence of taste and trigeminal irritation (chemesthesis) on durational aspects of tongue movement in liquid swallowing, controlling for the influence of perceived taste intensity.

MethodElectromagnetic midsagittal articulography was used to trace tongue movements during discrete liquid swallowing with 5 liquids: water, 3 moderate concentration tastants without odor (sweet, sour, sweet-sour), and a high concentration of citric acid (sour taste plus chemesthesis). Participants were 33 healthy adults in 2 gender-balanced, age-stratified groups (under/over 50). Perceived taste intensity was measured using the Generalized Labeled Magnitude Scale (Bartoshuk, 2000; Bartoshuk et al., 2004). Tongue movement sequencing and durations of the composite tongue movement envelope and component events (rise phase, location of first movement peak, release phase) were calculated.

ResultsNo obligate sequence of tongue segment movement was observed. Overall durations and the timing of the first movement peak were significantly longer with water than with the moderate concentration of sweet-sour liquid. Perceived taste intensity did not modulate stimulus effects in a significant way. The expected pattern of shorter movement durations with the high concentration of citric acid was not seen.

ConclusionsA chemesthetic-taste stimulus of high citric acid did not influence the durations of tongue movements compared with those seen during the swallowing of moderate concentration tastants and water.

Acknowledgments
This research was supported by Canadian Institutes of Health Research Grants 69521, 644200, and 83888 and the Toronto Rehabilitation Institute, and, in part, from the Canada Research Chairs Program. Equipment and space have been funded with grants from the Canada Foundation for Innovation and the Province of Ontario. The authors acknowledge the support of the Toronto Rehabilitation Institute, which receives funding under the Provincial Rehabilitation Research Program from the Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care in Ontario. The views expressed in this article are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect those of the ministry, nor the official policy or position of the Department of the Army, nor the United States Government. Additionally, the authors gratefully acknowledge the assistance of Janice Bennett, Aravind Namasivayam, Lyen Mortensen, Becky Cliffe, Mitsuko Takeuchi, Heidi Diepstra, Kyle Vernest, Carolyn Niu, Brian Kates, and Melissa Griffin with data collection and processing.
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