Is Tongue Strength an Important Influence on Rate of Articulation in Diadochokinetic and Reading Tasks? PurposeThe purpose of this study was to assess the relationship between tongue strength and rate of articulation in 2 speech tasks, diadochokinetic rates and reading aloud, in healthy men and women between 20 and 78 years of age.MethodDiadochokinetic rates were measured for the syllables /pʌ/, /tʌ/, /kʌ/, and /pʌtəkə/, and ... Article
Article  |   February 01, 2012
Is Tongue Strength an Important Influence on Rate of Articulation in Diadochokinetic and Reading Tasks?
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Amy T. Neel
    University of New Mexico, Albuquerque
  • Phyllis M. Palmer
    University of New Mexico, Albuquerque
  • Correspondence to Amy T. Neel: atneel@unm.edu
  • Editor: Anne Smith
    Editor: Anne Smith×
  • Associate Editor: Wolfram Ziegler
    Associate Editor: Wolfram Ziegler×
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosody / Speech
Article   |   February 01, 2012
Is Tongue Strength an Important Influence on Rate of Articulation in Diadochokinetic and Reading Tasks?
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 2012, Vol. 55, 235-246. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2011/10-0258)
History: Received September 13, 2010 , Revised March 1, 2011 , Accepted May 6, 2011
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 2012, Vol. 55, 235-246. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2011/10-0258)
History: Received September 13, 2010; Revised March 1, 2011; Accepted May 6, 2011
Web of Science® Times Cited: 7

PurposeThe purpose of this study was to assess the relationship between tongue strength and rate of articulation in 2 speech tasks, diadochokinetic rates and reading aloud, in healthy men and women between 20 and 78 years of age.

MethodDiadochokinetic rates were measured for the syllables /pʌ/, /tʌ/, /kʌ/, and /pʌtəkə/, and articulation rates were calculated for a reading of the Rainbow Passage for 57 adult volunteers. The Iowa Oral Performance Instrument (LLC Northwest) was used to obtain maximum tongue pressure, tongue pressure exerted during production of /tʌ/, and tongue endurance. Correlation analyses were performed to determine the relation among articulation rate and tongue pressure and endurance measures.

ResultsMaximum tongue pressure, the pressure used to produce /tʌ/, the proportion of maximum pressure used to produce /tʌ/, and tongue endurance were poor predictors of diadochokinetic rates and articulation rate in reading for healthy speakers.

DiscussionFocus must remain on factors beyond strength, such as movement precision and coordination, to improve researchers' understanding of normal and disordered speech production in adults.

Acknowledgments
We gratefully acknowledge the assistance of student experimenters Erika Olsson, Paul Leos, and Kate Trujillo in collecting data and Dylan Cunnington and Benjamin Martin in analyzing the data for this study. Sincere gratitude is also extended to all of the volunteer participants.
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