New Measures of Masked Text Recognition in Relation to Speech-in-Noise Perception and Their Associations With Age and Cognitive Abilities PurposeIn this research, the authors aimed to increase the analogy between Text Reception Threshold (TRT; Zekveld, George, Kramer, Goverts, & Houtgast, 2007) and Speech Reception Threshold (SRT; Plomp & Mimpen, 1979) and to examine the TRT’s value in estimating cognitive abilities that are important for speech comprehension in noise.MethodThe authors ... Article
Article  |   February 01, 2012
New Measures of Masked Text Recognition in Relation to Speech-in-Noise Perception and Their Associations With Age and Cognitive Abilities
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Jana Besser
    VU University Medical Center, The EMGO+ Institute for Health and Care Research, Amsterdam, The Netherlands
  • Adriana A. Zekveld
    VU University Medical Center, The EMGO+ Institute for Health and Care Research, Amsterdam, The Netherlands
  • Sophia E. Kramer
    VU University Medical Center, The EMGO+ Institute for Health and Care Research, Amsterdam, The Netherlands
  • Jerker Rönnberg
    Linnaeus Centre HEAD, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Sweden
  • Joost M. Festen
    VU University Medical Center, The EMGO+ Institute for Health and Care Research, Amsterdam, The Netherlands
  • Correspondence to Jana Besser: j.besser@vumc.nl
  • Editor: Sid Bacon
    Editor: Sid Bacon×
  • Associate Editor: Pam Souza
    Associate Editor: Pam Souza×
Article Information
Hearing Disorders / Special Populations / Genetic & Congenital Disorders / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Hearing
Article   |   February 01, 2012
New Measures of Masked Text Recognition in Relation to Speech-in-Noise Perception and Their Associations With Age and Cognitive Abilities
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 2012, Vol. 55, 194-209. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2011/11-0008)
History: Received January 7, 2011 , Accepted June 9, 2011
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 2012, Vol. 55, 194-209. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2011/11-0008)
History: Received January 7, 2011; Accepted June 9, 2011
Web of Science® Times Cited: 26

PurposeIn this research, the authors aimed to increase the analogy between Text Reception Threshold (TRT; Zekveld, George, Kramer, Goverts, & Houtgast, 2007) and Speech Reception Threshold (SRT; Plomp & Mimpen, 1979) and to examine the TRT’s value in estimating cognitive abilities that are important for speech comprehension in noise.

MethodThe authors administered 5 TRT versions, SRT tests in stationary (SRTSTAT) and modulated (SRTMOD) noise, and 2 cognitive tests: a reading span (RSpan) test for working memory capacity and a letter–digit substitution test for information-processing speed. Fifty-five adults with normal hearing (18–78 years, M = 44 years) participated. The authors examined mutual associations of the tests and their predictive value for the SRTs with correlation and linear regression analyses.

ResultsSRTs and TRTs were well associated, also when controlling for age. Correlations for the SRTSTAT were generally lower than for the SRTMOD. The cognitive tests were correlated to the SRTs only when age was not controlled for. Age and the TRTs were the only significant predictors of SRTMOD. SRTSTAT was predicted by level of education and some of the TRT versions.

ConclusionsTRTs and SRTs are robustly associated, nearly independent of age. The association between SRTs and RSpan is largely age dependent. The TRT test and the RSpan test measure different nonauditory components of linguistic processing relevant for speech perception in noise.

Acknowledgments
Funding for this research was provided by Foundation Het Heinsius-Houbolt Fonds. We would also like to acknowledge the support received from the Swedish Research Council, the technical assistance and software development provided by Hans van Beek, and the efforts of the study participants.
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