Bilingual Listeners' Perception of Temporally Manipulated English Passages PurposeThe current study measured, objectively and subjectively, how changes in speech rate affect recognition of English passages in bilingual listeners.MethodTen native monolingual, 20 English-dominant bilingual, and 20 non-English-dominant bilingual listeners repeated target words in English passages at five speech rates (unprocessed, two expanded, and two compressed), in quiet and in ... Article
Article  |   February 01, 2012
Bilingual Listeners' Perception of Temporally Manipulated English Passages
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Lu-Feng Shi
    Long Island University, New York, NY
  • Nadia Farooq
    Long Island University, New York, NY
  • Correspondence to Lu-Feng Shi: lu.shi@liu.edu
  • Editor: Robert Schlauch
    Editor: Robert Schlauch×
  • Associate Editor: Karen Helfer
    Associate Editor: Karen Helfer×
Article Information
Hearing & Speech Perception / Acoustics / Special Populations / Cultural & Linguistic Diversity / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Hearing
Article   |   February 01, 2012
Bilingual Listeners' Perception of Temporally Manipulated English Passages
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 2012, Vol. 55, 125-138. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2011/10-0297)
History: Received October 22, 2010 , Revised February 25, 2011 , Accepted May 17, 2011
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 2012, Vol. 55, 125-138. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2011/10-0297)
History: Received October 22, 2010; Revised February 25, 2011; Accepted May 17, 2011
Web of Science® Times Cited: 9

PurposeThe current study measured, objectively and subjectively, how changes in speech rate affect recognition of English passages in bilingual listeners.

MethodTen native monolingual, 20 English-dominant bilingual, and 20 non-English-dominant bilingual listeners repeated target words in English passages at five speech rates (unprocessed, two expanded, and two compressed), in quiet and in noise. For noise conditions, performance was measured at a signal-to-noise ratio that was determined through an adaptive procedure to avoid ceiling and floor effects. Listeners also made subjective judgments of speech rate, speech clarity, and performance confidence.

ResultsIn noise, stepwise improvement was observed as rate slowed down. A similar effect was not found in quiet. This pattern in performance was largely comparable across listener groups but was most robust in English-dominant listeners. Changes in speech rate and presence of noise significantly affected listeners' subjective ratings; however, no intergroup differences were observed for any of the subjective ratings.

ConclusionsBilingual listeners benefited from slow speech rates, more evidently so in noise than in quiet. Their performance, however, did not reach a monolingual level, even at the most favorable rate. Nonetheless, all listeners reported comparable confidence when processing temporally manipulated English passages.

Acknowledgments
This project was partial fulfillment of requirements for the second author’s master of science degree. Portions of this work were presented at the 2009 American Speech-Language-Hearing Association Convention in New Orleans, Louisiana.We would like to thank all volunteers who participated in this study. We are grateful to Laura Koenig, Nelson Moses, and Gina Youmans for their helpful comments at different stages of the project that led to the publication of this article.
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