Speech Recognition and Acoustic Features in Combined Electric and Acoustic Stimulation PurposeIn this study, the authors aimed to identify speech information processed by a hearing aid (HA) that is additive to information processed by a cochlear implant (CI) as a function of signal-to-noise ratio (SNR).MethodSpeech recognition was measured with CI alone, HA alone, and CI + HA. Ten participants were separated ... Article
Article  |   February 01, 2012
Speech Recognition and Acoustic Features in Combined Electric and Acoustic Stimulation
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Yang-soo Yoon
    House Ear Institute, Los Angeles, CA
  • Yongxin Li
    Beijing TongRen Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing, People’s Republic of China
  • Qian-Jie Fu
    House Ear Institute, Los Angeles, CA
  • Correspondence to Yongxin Li: lyxent@hotmail.com
  • Editor: Sid Bacon
    Editor: Sid Bacon×
  • Associate Editor: Eric Healy
    Associate Editor: Eric Healy×
Article Information
Hearing & Speech Perception / Acoustics / Hearing Aids, Cochlear Implants & Assistive Technology / Hearing
Article   |   February 01, 2012
Speech Recognition and Acoustic Features in Combined Electric and Acoustic Stimulation
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 2012, Vol. 55, 105-124. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2011/10-0325)
History: Received November 18, 2010 , Revised February 8, 2011 , Accepted May 15, 2011
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, February 2012, Vol. 55, 105-124. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2011/10-0325)
History: Received November 18, 2010; Revised February 8, 2011; Accepted May 15, 2011
Web of Science® Times Cited: 11

PurposeIn this study, the authors aimed to identify speech information processed by a hearing aid (HA) that is additive to information processed by a cochlear implant (CI) as a function of signal-to-noise ratio (SNR).

MethodSpeech recognition was measured with CI alone, HA alone, and CI + HA. Ten participants were separated into 2 groups; good (aided pure-tone average [PTA] < 55 dB) and poor (aided PTA ≥ 55 dB) at audiometric frequencies ≤ 1 kHz in HA.

ResultsResults showed that the good-aided PTA group derived a clear bimodal benefit (performance difference between CI + HA and CI alone) for vowel and sentence recognition in noise, whereas the poor-aided PTA group received little benefit across speech tests and SNRs. Results also showed that a better aided PTA helped in processing cues embedded in both low and high frequencies; none of these cues was significantly perceived by the poor-aided PTA group.

ConclusionsThe aided PTA is an important indicator for bimodal advantage in speech perception. The lack of bimodal benefits in the poor group may be attributed to the nonoptimal HA fitting. Bimodal listening provides a synergistic effect for cues in both low- and high-frequency components in speech.

Acknowledgments
This work was supported by National Institutes of Health Grant 5R01DC004993. We thank our participants for their time and effort. We thank Jaesook Gho, Tianhao Li, Aiguo Liu, and Joseph Crew for their editorial assistance and valuable comments and Hou-Yong Kang for his help in data collection.
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