Peer Interactions of Preschool Children With and Without Hearing Loss PurposeLittle is known about the social interaction skills of children with severe to profound hearing loss (SPHL) in terms of how they manage conversational exchanges with peers. This study compared the initiation and response skills of children with SPHL with those of children with typical hearing during group play in ... Article
Article  |   August 01, 2011
Peer Interactions of Preschool Children With and Without Hearing Loss
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Joanne DeLuzio
    University of Toronto, Ontario, Canada
    University of Toronto, Ontario, Canada
  • Luigi Girolametto
    University of Toronto, Ontario, Canada
    University of Toronto, Ontario, Canada
  • Correspondence to Joanne DeLuzio: jo.deluzio@utoronto.ca
  • Editor: Robert Schlauch
    Editor: Robert Schlauch×
  • Associate Editor: Derek Houston
    Associate Editor: Derek Houston×
Article Information
Hearing & Speech Perception / Hearing Disorders / School-Based Settings / Hearing
Article   |   August 01, 2011
Peer Interactions of Preschool Children With and Without Hearing Loss
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, August 2011, Vol. 54, 1197-1210. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2010/10-0099)
History: Received April 11, 2010 , Revised September 29, 2010 , Accepted December 4, 2010
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, August 2011, Vol. 54, 1197-1210. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2010/10-0099)
History: Received April 11, 2010; Revised September 29, 2010; Accepted December 4, 2010
Web of Science® Times Cited: 6

PurposeLittle is known about the social interaction skills of children with severe to profound hearing loss (SPHL) in terms of how they manage conversational exchanges with peers. This study compared the initiation and response skills of children with SPHL with those of children with typical hearing during group play in integrated preschool programs.

MethodTwo groups of 12 children were matched on a number of variables and assessed for intelligence, language, speech, and social development. All initiations, responses, and resulting interactions during 20 min of group play were transcribed and coded. Outcome measures included number and type of initiation strategies, number of responses, and length of interactions.

ResultsDespite poorer speech, language, and social development, there were no significant differences in initiation and response skills measured between children with SPHL and their matched peers. The small sample size may have made differences difficult to detect; however, playmates initiated interactions less often with the children with SPHL and ignored their initiations more often than those of other children.

ConclusionsPreschool children with SPHL were excluded from interactions by their playmates. Having age-appropriate language skills did not ensure successful peer interactions. Inclusive preschool programs may consider offering classroom-wide social skills training to enhance interaction opportunities.

Acknowledgment
This research was supported by the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada, the Canadian Language and Literacy Network, the Ontario Graduate Scholarship Program, and the University of Toronto.
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