Supervised Home Training of Dialogue Skills in Chronic Aphasia: A Randomized Parallel Group Study PurposeThe aim of this study was to prove the efficacy of supervised self-training for individuals with aphasia. Linguistic and communicative performance in structured dialogues represented the main study parameters.MethodIn a cross-over design for randomized matched pairs, 18 individuals with chronic aphasia were examined during 12 weeks of supervised home training. ... Article
Article  |   August 01, 2011
Supervised Home Training of Dialogue Skills in Chronic Aphasia: A Randomized Parallel Group Study
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Ruth Nobis-Bosch
    University Hospital Aachen, Aachen, Germany
  • Luise Springer
    University Hospital Aachen, Aachen, Germany
  • Irmgard Radermacher
    University Hospital Aachen, Aachen, Germany
  • Walter Huber
    University Hospital Aachen, Aachen, Germany
  • Correspondence to Ruth Nobis-Bosch: Ruth.Nobis.Bosch@rwth-aachen.de
  • Editor: Karla McGregor
    Editor: Karla McGregor×
  • Associate Editor: Mary Kennedy
    Associate Editor: Mary Kennedy×
Article Information
Language Disorders / Aphasia / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Language
Article   |   August 01, 2011
Supervised Home Training of Dialogue Skills in Chronic Aphasia: A Randomized Parallel Group Study
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, August 2011, Vol. 54, 1118-1136. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2010/09-0204)
History: Received September 18, 2009 , Revised March 21, 2010 , Accepted December 3, 2010
 
Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, August 2011, Vol. 54, 1118-1136. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2010/09-0204)
History: Received September 18, 2009; Revised March 21, 2010; Accepted December 3, 2010
Web of Science® Times Cited: 9

PurposeThe aim of this study was to prove the efficacy of supervised self-training for individuals with aphasia. Linguistic and communicative performance in structured dialogues represented the main study parameters.

MethodIn a cross-over design for randomized matched pairs, 18 individuals with chronic aphasia were examined during 12 weeks of supervised home training. Intensive language training, assisted by an electronic learning device (B.A.Bar), was compared with nonlinguistic training. Language performance, communicative abilities, and cognitive abilities were controlled before and after each intervention and at follow-up. The language training was designed to facilitate dialogue skills as required in everyday life.

ResultsRobust and specific improvements in the participants' linguistic and communicative abilities were obtained using B.A.Bar dialogue training but not with nonlinguistic training. The transfer to general linguistic and communicative performance remained limited when the whole group was considered. For 30%–50% of the participants, individual analysis revealed significant improvements in spontaneous language and general communicative skills. Furthermore, individual participants demonstrated significant improvements regarding standardized aphasia assessment and proxy rating of communicative effectiveness.

ConclusionSupervised home training works. This study has proven that it is an effective tool for bolstering linguistic and communicative skills of individuals with aphasia.

Acknowledgments
This study was supported by ZNS-Hannelore Kohl Stiftung Grant 2003004, Else Kröner-Fresenius-Stiftung Grant P00/05//A71/05//F0, and the Swiss Foundation of Rehabilitation Technology.
We thank our colleagues from the Aachen Aphasia Ward for their support in selecting the participants. We acknowledge the cooperation of colleagues in private practice who performed the supervision during home training: E. Schiedermeier, S. Syllwasschy, T. Strauch, C. van Hout, F. Schwiertz, S. Kolewa, D. Rohner, K. Schüller, G. van Dyk-Stolz, B. Engell, U. Lisinski, S. Linke, S. Fischer, S. Holthotte, S. Hütte-Thome, Fr. Sprich, K. von Lengen, Fr. Wachsmuth, V. Seidler. We would like to express special thanks to Klaus Willmes for statistical advice and supervision.
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